How CrossFit helped me love my body


By Mirella Flores

For years I struggled with an eating disorder. It started with me restricting food and evolved into a cycle of restricting, binging on food (like anything I could get a hold of), and doing cardio for hours. My journey to recovery has been long and hard. Even when I was at a point where I no longer was engaging in disordered eating, I still struggled with my body.

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Source: CrossFitMatters Instagram

As a cisgender woman, I have been socialized to base myself worth on the appearance of my body and being sexually desirable to others. While I was working towards recovery, I was with a partner who was very affirming of my body. This helped me start to believe that my body is great and beautiful just how it is. However, I was still relying on someone else’s opinion of my body to feel good. I still can not say that I do not care what others think of my body, but I can surely say I have learned to value my body in a different way.

When I moved to Kansas City in 2014 for graduate school, someone asked me what I liked to do for self-care (if you’re a counseling psychologist or trainee, you are probably used to being asked that question). I told her I liked working out and she suggested I try CrossFit. I had grown bored of my gym routine (running and doing some weight lifting), so I told myself, “Why not?” I joined CrossFit Matters, and during my first day heard about the holistic approach they take to fitness. Being aware of my eating disorder history, I knew this would be a good change.

CrossFit showed me that I am competing against myself and nobody else. It also showed me that this too, like recovering from an eating disorder, was a journey into learning about my body. As CrossFit pushed me physically and mentally, I came to notice and appreciate my body for what it does. Yes, I have noticed my body change, but that is not what I have come to value. I have come to value my body because of what it is capable of doing. Every time I break a personal record, I am even more amazed with the functionality of my body and my own dedication. I rejoice, not because of how my body looks like, but because of what it does. I have not been alone in this journey. I have had other athletes and coaches be as excited as I am. CrossFit has given me a supportive community that encourages each other to keep discovering our strengths and improving our skills. Without my body being properly fueled, I wouldn’t be able to continue amazing myself by breaking a personal record!

 CrossFit helped me love my body and improve my self-image. What has helped you appreciate your body?

Binge Eating: The Invisible Eating Disorder

by Danielle Lyons

When the topic of eating disorders come up, one thinks of the notorious two; Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa. But alas there is another we tend to forget: Binge Eating Disorder. According to The National Eating Disorders Association It is the most common disorder in the US. So why isn’t it talked about? Many women experience other’s denial that Binge Eating Disorder exists. It’s just written off as gluttonous behavior. This disorder is much more than a mere character flaw. It deserves to be recognized in an equal light.

The National Eating Disorders Association says: GetFileAttachment

“Binge Eating Disorder is an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of eating large quantities of food (often very quickly and to the point of discomfort); a feeling of a loss of control during the binge; experiencing shame, distress or guilt afterwards; and not regularly using unhealthy compensatory measures (e.g., purging) to counter the binge eating. Binge eating disorder is a severe, life-threatening and treatable eating disorder.”

It is important to remember that weight or weight gain is different in each case. It isn’t strictly a disorder affected by the obese. That is where we make our mistake; we make that assumption. Eating disorders do not discriminate. If that were the case, one could argue that every person who is overweight struggles with the disorder. The fact of the matter is most overweight individuals do not have Binge Eating Disorder.

It is important to remember for eating disorders that root of the problem isn’t the food. Binge Eating Disorder is no exception. According to Melissa A. Fabello of Everyday Feminism, “Eating disorders are bio-psychosocial in nature, which means that there are biological, psychological, and sociological factors at play that make a person susceptible to, and triggered into, eating disordered thoughts and behaviors. Eating disorders are seriously complex. But at its root, your eating disorder is a mental health issue.” Although each eating disorder is unique with their own complexity, they have one commonality. Recovery is a tough process differs from person to person.

If you suspect you or someone you care about might be suffering from binge eating disorder, there are resources available. Some resources include but are not limited to The UMKC Counseling Center, Binge Eating Disorder Association, And National Eating Disorders Association.