Join us for National Equal Pay Day!

National-Equal-Pay-Day-(2)Join us on the Quad for National Equal Pay Day. These information tables will raise your awareness to the pay inequities that women still face. This date, April 9, symbolizes how far in 2013 women must work in order to earn the same wages earned by men during 2012. This event is co-sponsored by UMKC Career Services, the American Association of University Women, and the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau.

Here are some photos from last April’s event.

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For more information on this and other Women’s Center events, visit us online, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter!

April 9th is National Equal Pay Day

This year’s National Equal Pay Day occurs on April 9th. This date represents how far in 2013 women must work to earn the same wages that men earned in 2012.  Join us on the Quad for resources and food with the UMKC Women’s Center, UMKC Career Services, American Association of University Women, and the U.S. Department of Labor Women’s Bureau. Learn more about the wage gap and gather resources about salary negotiation.

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In the meantime, take a few minutes to review these online resources to learn more about National Equal Pay Day.

http://www.pay-equity.org/

The official website for the National Committee on Pay Equity.

 

http://www.aauw.org/

The American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been empowering women as individuals and as a community since 1881. For more than 130 years, they have worked together as a national grassroots organization to improve the lives of millions of women and their families.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/meghancasserly/2013/02/14/gender-pay-gap-wider-2012-and-its-great-for-women/

From Forbes writer Megan Casserly, a quick read on why the pay gap is widening and how that can actually benefit women. Be sure to check out the slideshow describing what women could afford if they earned equal pay for equal work.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/07/gender-wage-gap-2012_n_2830173.html

Jillian Berman of Huffington Post explains how recovery of the national economy held back job growth for women.

 

http://www.aauw.org/article/50-years-after-the-equal-pay-act-parity-eludes-us/

A great article posted on the AAUW website by Beth Pearsall on the origins of Fair Pay legislation dating back to the 1890s.

 

http://www.levoleague.com/news/what-is-lean-in-why-should-i-care

Learn more about Sheryl Sandberg and her Lean In campaign that has been gaining recognition since she premiered her message at a TED Talk in 2010. Sandberg’s new book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, was released on March 11, 2013.

 

http://www.levoleague.com/office-hours-recaps/media-impact-on-women-in-stem

Read Melissa Stanger’s criticism of stereotyped portrayals of women in STEM fields and her assessment of how the media perpetuates those images.

 

http://www.levoleague.com/career-advice/amanda-palmer-ted-talk-the-art-of-asking

Alix Montes’ reviews Amanda Palmer’s TED talk on “The Art of Asking.”

 

http://www.levoleague.com/career-advice/7-ways-you-are-sabotaging-your-job-interview

Meredith Repore shares tips for a successful job interview.

 

For more information on the Women’s Center and our calendar of events, visit us online, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.

 

Women’s History Month Profile: Susan B. Anthony

By Briana Ward.

susan b anthonySusan B. Anthony (1820 – 1906), grew up in a Massachusetts a Quaker family with activist traditions. Growing up in this type of environment, Anthony developed a strong sense of justice early in life. When she got older, she began going to temperance meetings. Although she was unable to voice her thoughts and opinions, she still attended the meetings. She was disturbed by not being able to insert her opinions regarding the temperance movement, so she joined the women’s suffrage movement. Women’s suffrage became an important part in her life.

Frederick Douglass & Susan B. Anthony sculpture at Susan B. Anthony house

Frederick Douglass & Susan B. Anthony sculpture at Susan B. Anthony house

She campaigned against abolition of slavery,the right for women to own their own property and retain their earnings, and she advocated for women’s labor organizations. Persuading the University of Rochester to admit women was an enormous milestone. Here is a list of a few amazing things she accomplished as a labor activist, suffragist, abolitionist, and temperance worker (from susanbanthonyhouse.org):

  • 1848: Anthony made her first public speech at a Daughters of Temperance supper.
  • 1863: Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized a Women’s National Loyal League to support and petition for the Thirteenth Amendment outlawing slavery. They went on to campaign for full citizenship for women and people of any race, including the right to vote, in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments.
Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, & Susan B. Anthony sculpture in the U.S. Capitol rotunda

Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, & Susan B. Anthony sculpture in the U.S. Capitol rotunda

  • 1866: Anthony and Stanton founded the American Equal Rights Association. In 1868, they began publishing the newspaper, The Revolution, in Rochester, with the masthead “Men their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less,” and the aim of establishing “justice for all.” The Revolution also advocated an eight-hour work day and equal pay for equal work. It promoted a policy of purchasing American-made goods and encouraging immigration to rebuild the South and settle the entire country. Publishing The Revolution in New York brought her in contact with women in the printing trades.
  • 1870: Anthony formed and was elected president of the Workingwomen’s Central Association. The WCA drew up reports on working conditions and provided educational opportunities for working women. Anthony encouraged a cooperative workshop founded by the Sewing Machine Operators Union and boosted the newly-formed women typesetters’ union in The Revolution. Anthony tried to establish trade schools for women printers. When printers in New York went on strike, she urged employers to hire women instead, believing this would show that they could do the job as well as men, and therefore prove that they deserved equal pay. At the 1869 National Labor Union Congress, the men’s Typographical Union accused her of strike- breaking and running a non-union shop at The Revolution, and called her an enemy of labor.

Make a Statement with Denim for Denim Day USA

By Joseph Salazar.

2013-Demin-Day-USAComing up on Tuesday, April 4 from 5-7PM, the Violence Prevention and Response Project is sponsoring Make a Statement with Denim. Make a Statement with Denim is co-sponsored by MOSCA. This event is part of Denim Day USA. Make a Statement with Denim will be held at the UMKC Women’s Center in 105 Haag Hall. RSVPs are not necessary for this event.

Come show your support and design jeans to make statement against sexual assault. Jeans will be used in the Denim Day 2013 display, which takes place from Monday, April 15-Wednesday April 24 in the Rockhill Parking Structure Skywalk at 52nd & Rockhill. On Wednesday April 24, join us in wearing jeans as a visible means of protest against the misconceptions surrounding sexual assault. We hope to see you there!

For more information on this or other Women’s Center events, please visit our website. For more information on the Violence Prevention and Response Project, please visit our website. You can like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Women’s History Month Profile: Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti

By Briana Ward.

Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was known as the leader for women’s rights in Nigeria, and she was also known as “The Mother of Africa.”  I would like to take this time to acknowledge her for Women’s History Month and share her story and the changes she made in Nigeria.

kuti 2Kuti was raised by parents who believed in the value of education. She attended school in Abeokuta and England. Kuti returned home to teach, and in 1925 married the Reverend Israel Oludotun Ransome-Kuti, founder of the Nigerian Union of Teachers (NUT) and Nigerian Union of Students (NUS), a forerunner of the National Council of Nigeria and Cameroons (NCNC). Kuti was active in the NCNC, leading the women’s wing.

 

A career in feminist activism began for Kuti in 1932 when she founded the Abeokuta Ladies Club (ALC). Initially membership was mostly Western-educated and working-class women. The club expanded in 1944 to include market women. To begin working against injustice and the exploitation of market women, in 1946 the ALC became the Abeokuta Women’s Union (AWU), and membership was expanded. Over 100,000 Abeokuta women worked together to provide social welfare services and to pursue a gender-conscious agenda. In 1949, the AWU expanded to the Nigerian Women’s Union (NWU), a national organization that became known at the Federation of Nigerian Women’s Societies (FNWS) in 1953. With Kuti’s leadership, the FNWS was dedicated to addressing the concerns of all Nigerian women and improving their position in society, including education, suffrage, health care, and other social services.

“Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti was a pioneering nationalist who fought against British colonialism and a cultural nationalist…a pioneer African feminist and a human rights activist who was tireless in her campaigns for women’s rights and for economic, political, and social justice. She was an educator who gave a voice to the voiceless and education to the uneducated.” – Oxford Dictionary of African Biography

Kuti biography coverKuti’s was a powerful voice across Nigeria. I love that she was a woman who was not only leading and teaching women, but teaching everyone. Her defense of women was her mission, and her words and actions mattered in Nigerian society.  If you want to read Kuti’s biography and what she has done to affect the feminist movement, look for:  For Women and the Nation: Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti of Nigeria by Cheryl Johnson-Odim and Nina Emma Mba.

CineWomen: A Night to Remember

By Morgan Elyse Christensen

CineWomen 2013 was a huge hit in Kansas City and the committee will soon begin planning for next year’s “CineWomen 2014”!

Almost one hundred guests arrived at the Screenland Crossroads Theatre on March 14 to show their support for our area’s female student filmmakers. Five different Kansas City area universities and many community members came together to make the event a night to remember as we celebrated Women’s History Month with a panel discussion, a short film screening, and a networking reception.

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The panel discussion turned out to be an incredibly motivating and educational segment as UMKC’s Professor Caitlin Horsmon, KU’s Dr. Tamara Falicov, and Avila’s Dr. Dottie Hamilton reported on the trials and accomplishments of women filmmakers in the past and present and spoke to the inspiration of our future women in film.

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The crowd was ecstatic over the screening’s featured short films. We were privileged to have had the opportunity to show such quality work and are very pleased that most of the filmmakers had a chance to show the community what they have or will have to offer upon graduation. A well-known women’s film festival in neighboring Columbia, MO (Citizen Jane) even caught word of our event and lent a hand in helping promote the careers of each of our featured artists.

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IMG_8021The evening ended with a tribute to the late Dr. Carol Koehler who broke ground in Kansas City as a female filmmaker and those in attendance were touched by the speech delivered by Dr. Poe, Associate Professor of UMKC and good friend to the Koehler family, the presence of whose members we were also graced with that evening.

Putting together events like this, there is not always a guarantee that you’ll have a good turnout or full support from a variety of community members and organizations. However, we had an amazing turnout for our first year and through the community enthusiasm that CineWomen seemed to unveil in Kansas City and through our mission of advocating, educating, and supporting women and their artistic contributions, this event is set to grow boundlessly over the years and become recognized as one of the most important platform events for the inspiration of young woman filmmakers in Kansas City, the education of our community, and the advancement of women in the film industry as a whole.

Introducing Our New Graduate Assistant: Katelyn Bidondo

KATIE-Blog PicHola! My name is Katelyn Bidondo!  I am thrilled to be the new Graduate Assistant in the UMKC Women’s Center.  I received my B.A. in Spanish from UMKC in the spring of 2012 and am currently working on my masters in romance languages with an emphasis in Spanish. I have about one year left of my masters, after which I plan on heading to law school, hopefully at the UMKC School of Law, the best law school in Missouri. Brownie points for mentioning it in my blog? Anyways, like I said before, I am absolutely thrilled to be working in the Women’s Center. As a woman I am supremely interested in furthering the rights of women through education and advocacy. Eventually with my law degree, I hope to be able to enforce and increase the rights and liberties of women everywhere. Needless to say the UMKC Women’s Center will be a great way to start me on this path!

UMKC Faculty Profile: Kathleen Kilway

By Joseph Salazar.

March is Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is “Women Inspiring Innovation Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics”.

Women today currently earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields. Keeping that startling statistic in mind and in celebration of this year’s theme, I’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to some of the women at UMKC who are a part of STEM fields. I had the wonderful opportunity of learning about what it’s like to be a woman in STEM through a Q&A with several faculty members at UMKC.

katherinevkillwayKathleen Kilway, Professor—Department of Chemistry

Why did you go into your field? As a high school student, I always enjoyed and excelled in math and science. After talking with my father, I chose a 3:2 program between Notre Dame and St. Mary’s College where one receives a BS in Chemistry (SMC) and a BS in Engineering (ND). After a year, I decided to just complete my BS in Chemistry at SMC. In my last year of undergrad, I was advised to pursue a graduate degree in chemistry. I was sold when I found out that I would be able to continue my studies with a stipend and be able to attend a different University (in my case, it was University of California San Diego – sunny southern California). I chose chemistry (rather than healthcare or biology) because I wanted to try and understand how things worked and interactions at the molecular level.

What are your research interests? My research interests include an area of physical organic chemistry with emphases in synthesis of organic and organometallic compounds, experimental and conformational studies, hydrogen bonding, and molecular synthesis and assembly. From my physical organic chemistry background, I have been able to work on applied research such as the development, synthesis, formulation and testing of dental, bone cement, and biomaterials.

What was it like being a woman in your field when you entered it? When I started at SMC, it was not an issue because it was an all-women’s college so it was live and let live. I thrived in that environment and did not understand the difference until I moved to my graduate career. At UCSD, it became apparent that there were fewer women in the field, especially organic chemistry. There was a stereotyping of women – that they had to be serious and dress rather unisex in order to succeed. Therefore, I had to be driven and motivated to complete the degree. It was also a matter of finding friends, colleagues, mentors, and a great advisor that helped me to succeed and enjoy the experience.

What is it like being a woman in your field today? It has changed some but there are always different groups that make it difficult. I have looked for other mentors, colleagues, and friends who have helped me in times of need but also to discuss personal and professional items. I am extremely grateful to my colleagues, mentors, and friends at UMKC who have helped over the years.

UMKC Faculty Profile: Ann Smith

By Joseph Salazar.

March is Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is “Women Inspiring Innovation Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics”.

Women today currently earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields. Keeping that startling statistic in mind and in celebration of this year’s theme, I’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to some of the women at UMKC who are a part of STEM fields. I had the wonderful opportunity of learning about what it’s like to be a woman in STEM through a Q&A with several faculty members at UMKC.

AnnAnn Smith, Professor—School of Biological Sciences

Why did you go into your field? I have always been interested in science and the natural world – even as a young child. When I was about ten years old, my father took me to the Natural History Museum in London where I drew the stuffed animals and birds and saw fossils for the first time. My father and I also went together by train to the south coast of England to dig in quarries where we found fossils of sea urchins and also a meteorite that I treasure to this day. We had to leave behind a huge (to my eyes) ammonite fossil that the workers had blasted out of the ground because we did not have a car and it was too heavy to carry!

What are your research interests? I am currently interested in how the cells of our bodies, especially those of our brain, control and safely manage the balance between metals: heme, iron itself and copper. These metals are vital for our cells but they are also very chemically reactive and thus potentially dangerous. They are known to   cause and exacerbate disease including neurodegeneration. I hope that the heme transporter that I work on, hemopexin, which means heme fixer or grabber, can be used therapeutically and perhaps diagnostically in the near future. 

What was being a woman in that field like when you entered? I started my independent research for my Ph.D. thesis in the mid-1960s when there were far fewer women than men in science. Everybody, whether male or female flourishes with good mentoring and I was fortunate that at King’s College, which is part of the University of London, that  I had a Ph.D. advisor and a senior Professor who were very supportive of me and my research efforts. They encouraged me in every way and helped me get together (that is, my advisor paid for) some unique lab resources so that I could get my research done. These included having two 6 foot high cabinets specially built that allowed me to perfuse rat livers to keep them alive in order to study drug metabolism. This included work on a family of enzymes, biological catalysts and the cytochrome P-450 enzymes that are currently under investigation as therapeutic drug targets in cancer.

What is it like being a woman in your field today? There have been changes on the international scene of science and I would say that gender is no longer an issue. Unfortunately, discrimination can and still does occur, perhaps most in situations of confidentiality – such as when one’s grants are reviewed and there is no appeal system in place.

UMKC Faculty Profile: Debra O’Bannon

By Joseph Salazar.

March is Women’s History Month. This year’s theme is “Women Inspiring Innovation Through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics”.

Women today currently earn 41% of PhD’s in STEM fields, but make up only 28% of tenure-track faculty in those fields. Keeping that startling statistic in mind and in celebration of this year’s theme, I’d like to take the opportunity to introduce you to some of the women at UMKC who are a part of STEM fields. I had the wonderful opportunity of learning about what it’s like to be a woman in STEM through a Q&A with several faculty members at UMKC. Their stories will appear throughout the week.

O'Bannon_DebDebra O’Bannon, Professor—Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering

Why did you go into the field you did? I have been in the civil engineering field since I was a sophomore in college. Although one of my mother’s cousins was a chemical engineer, I didn’t know him. All the people in my immediate family were blue-collar workers, with very little college experience. I was good at math, and a bit of a geek, and wanted to go into Physics (because that’s all I was familiar with). But, like hundreds of other freshman at MIT, physics didn’t pan out for me. A nice guy in my dorm was a civil engineering student (in transportation), and I liked that they had a track in environmental engineering. I was a college freshman in 1975 – the first Earth Day was in 1972. So that’s what I did. I’ve been in the water area for a long time.

What is it like being a woman in your field? When I was in college, there weren’t many women, but there were a few. People were nice to me, so it was nice to get a little extra attention. That was about the same when I worked after college. When I came to UMKC in 1989, I was the only woman on the engineering faculty until recently. There have been few problems—it does get a little lonely sometimes—so I am quite active in the Society of Women Engineers. One thing that is exciting for me to see is that there are [now] women engineering deans at universities, woman-owned engineering businesses, and women highly-placed in engineering corporations. While we are still few, our numbers are growing. And for myself, I am now a full Professor, and a Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers.