Tuesday, May 17, 2022
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Having the munchies helps feed California

College kids have a plethora of reasons to move to “The Golden State.” How could you resist the incessant amount of sunshine, the fanciful chance you might run into a celebrity crush or beloved musician, and, of course, that little thing called medical marijuana?

Missourians live vicariously through the Botwins on the Showtime series “Weeds,” but have very little experience with the legal stuff.

Still hesitant to tread west? A medical marijuana dispensary found a way to coax California citizens into philanthropy by trading marijuana for cans of food.

According to The Associated Press, The Granny Purps dispensary near San Francisco opted to spread all sorts of yuletide cheer by offering a complimentary marijuana cigarette for every four cans of food donated, with a maximum of three marijuana cigarettes a day.

About 2,000 marijuana cigarettes were exchanged for 11,000 pounds of food between November and Christmas Eve.

The donated food was distributed to Second Harvest Food Bank. The dispensary plans to continue the tradition next holiday season.

Two kidneys, who needs ‘em?

In a philosophy class, everything gets questioned, and the results can be mind-blowing. Professor Michael Taber of St. Mary’s College of Maryland teaches an Altruism and Egotism class. The name of the class alone sounds intriguing, but it gets way cooler.

According to National Public Radio, www.npr.org, Taber posed a philosophical question to his class worth five percent of the students’ final grade: Should he donate his kidney?

By doing so, Taber narrowly focused on the larger debate of organ donation and forced students to decide on whether it is immoral to keep both kidneys, when human beings can survive with only one.

He clarifies, “I was trying to come up with an exercise that would allow them to apply some of the concepts and some of the discussions that we were having in the seminar to a real issue.”

The students decided that he ought to keep his kidney, but Taber may revisit the question with another class. As a student, what would you decide?

sashlock@unews.com

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