Review: How does the latest “Halloween” installment stack up?

“Was that the Boogeyman?”

Yes, yes it was!

The knife wielding slasher is back haunting the wholesome neighborhood of Haddonfield, Illinois. Battling against the infamous Michael Myers is the one and only Jamie Lee Curtis. Curtis was introduced to movie goers in 1978 as Laurie Strode. The studious but feisty baby sister of the escaped serial killer is now older and has one goal: Kill Michael Myers.

In the newest installment of the “Halloween” franchise, which hit theatres Oct. 19, Laurie Strode is a basket case of  a grandmother. Living in a fortress-like home, she’s been waiting for the day her nemesis returns.

So, did creator John Carpenter live up to his 1978 classic?

On one hand, the film continues the classic style of horror films by limiting unnecessary scare jumps. The scares stay within the perimeter of the monster himself.

Notably, the film lacks the strong autumn setting that viewers fell in love with in the original movie. Audience members were put inside the film using sensory details, yet the 1978 film felt more like reality. This version, however, continues to remind us that this is just a movie.

Audiences unfamiliar with the original film will still be able to understand what’s going on, because the film does a good job of establishing Laurie and Michael’s forty-year relationship

“I don’t know. It felt campy. I enjoyed it but it felt like a teenage film versus a classic,” says audience member Areaonna.

If you still do not have plans for this Halloween, go to your nearest theater and enjoy the chaotic ride with Michael Myers.

In the words of Haddonfield’s sheriff, “You know it’s Halloween. I guess everyone’s entitled to one good scare, huh?

 

jmcq58@mail.umkc.edu

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