Tuesday, November 30, 2021
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Campus History: Fine Arts Building

The Fine Arts Building houses the Department of Art and Art History, Studio Art, the UMKC art gallery and Information Access
The Fine Arts Building houses the Department of Art and Art History, Studio Art, the UMKC art gallery and Information Access

The Fine Arts Building, at 5015 Holmes Street, was built as the university’s first chemistry-biology building in 1942.

The building was designed by Charles A. Smith, the same architect who designed Haag Hall in 1937.

A document from the UMKC archives lists that the Fine Arts building and Haag Hall’s exterior is known as “a modified collegiate gothic,” style.

The Fine Arts Building primarily houses the departments of art, art history and studio art. Those departments have over 278 undergraduate students. The UMKC Art Gallery is on the second floor.

The department also has two Masters of the Fine Arts programs- art history and studio art, with 51 graduate students.

The faculty consists of six full-time art history members, including one joint appointment with the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and seven full-time studio art faculty members.

“We have two Mac computer labs that are available for students in our department, used for graphic design, digital imaging and video and motion design classes, studio labs for photography, 3-D design, printmaking, drawing and painting and two Ideal Learning Evirnment (ILE) classrooms for Art History courses, as well as classes offered through other departments,” said Alicen Lundberg, administrative assistant in the Department of Art and Art History. “Total, we have nine classrooms, mainly with specialized functions. We also house the Visual Resources Library which offers support for professors in their teaching and research.”

Sitting on a slope, the building offers entrances to three of the four floors.

“The Fine Arts Building also houses Information Access, the department that provides support for Blackboard, SharePoint and other technology tools, on a majority of the third floor,” Lundberg said.

nbomgardner@unews.com

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