Tag Archives: Google Fiber

SCE Students and Staff Lead Google Fiber Summer App Camps for High School Students

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SCE students and staff were prime movers in ensuring two one-week Google Fiber Summer App Camps held this July at SCE were great successes. Matt Mohler, electrical computer engineering junior, IEEE Robotics team member and SCE Student Ambassador, served as the director for both camps. Using MIT’s App Inventor software and hands-on instructional techniques, students learned how to develop applications for Android platform phones. 17 Kansas City Missouri School District high school students and one teacher participated in the first camp session and 21 Kansas City Kansas School District high school students and two teachers participated in the second camp session. Continue reading

Deep Medhi answers Google Fiber questions

On March 30, the entire country watched as Google named its first high-speed broadband network site — Kansas City, Kan. At UMKC — just seven miles east of Google’s national test site.  Deep Medhi, SCE Professor of Computer Science, is also working to make Internet communications better, faster and more personalized. Because of his related research, Medhi answered questions about the #Google Fiber project during an NBC Action News live chat.  Click here to read the chat transcript and click here to view the complete UMKC Press Release.

Dr. Medhi is involved with the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) which was formed to explore the possibility of changing the Internet at its very core. GENI is a multi-site virtual laboratory for network science and engineering research, funded by the National Science Foundation.  As part of this effort, UMKC’s member group, the Great Plains Environment for Network Innovation (GpENI), received a three-year grant worth $462,500. Medhi is trying to devise a programmable network. GpENI partner schools each have their tasks: the University of Nebraska is working on optical networking needed for a programmable network. Kansas State University is working on the end device programmability, and the University of Kansas is devising a new control to connect these pieces.