Day 4: Inclusivity in OER

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Day 4: Inclusivity in OER

 

Moderators Morgan and MadiBy Morgan Staudinger and Madi Smith

Open education is not just about saving students thousands of dollars on textbook cost. This post intends to dive into the conversation of social justice and learn how OER can be used as a strategy for inclusive teaching. Because OER are openly licensed for revision, they can be adapted to help bring issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion into the learning environment.

Inclusivity should not be ignored when we talk about open educational resources. In this blog post from Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER), gives a great introduction into the topic. Just read the “Overview,” but feel free to browse through the rest of the blog posts as well.

Then watch “How OER can Support Student Equity and Diversity” webinar from the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources. Please watch Preston Davis’s part of the webinar from 7:28 min to 15:34 min but feel free to watch the whole webinar.


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References

Comment below

Activity 4

What is one take away you had from watching the webinar “How OER can support Student Equity and Diversity”?

2 thoughts on “Day 4: Inclusivity in OER

  1. I really enjoyed Dr. Preston Davis’s part of the “How OER can Support Student Equity and Diversity” webinar from the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources! My takeaway is that open material and courses can give an opportunity to individuals to learn about a subject without the cost and constraint of the typical higher education system. Or they could use the material to supplement what they are learning in classes.

  2. Often from an institutional vision, we are called to be socially conscious educators. Along with providing equal access to educational materials, we can’t ignore the components of diversity and inclusion when teaching our students. As our students view the course material from their own history and experiences, we should step into their shoes to see things through their lenses. Are people like me represented in this field? How has this knowledge shaped the world I grew up in? By starting with these questions from the student view, we can start to analyze whether the materials we use are inclusive and authentic to the voices in our class.

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