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Small City Dreams

Ye gods but Oxford is beautiful. I’ve been here for one whole hour and I am already in love. I’m staying in the dorms in Magdalen College; it’s the one with its own deer park. Can you imagine UMKC having a deer park in the middle of Kansas City? That would be wild. Don’t get me wrong, I love our quad, but there’s a distinct lack of deer. 

London’s West End has some great shows!

It is SO much quieter here than in central London. I had to stay at a hotel near Tottenham Court Road for the first couple days, just to get situated with my IFSA program. London is BUSY BUSY BUSY GO GO GO!!! There’s a constant flow and irregular heartbeat to the city that was very new to me. I can completely understand why people choose to make it their home. The tall buildings and narrow winding streets hid treasures around every corner. We took a VERY long walking tour and I got to see things I’d only read about in Dumas books. But, as I’ve lived in Kansas City for most of my life, it was a bit too much close quarters for me. I’m VERY glad to have learned that about myself before I committed to living in London or a similar big city. 

The deer get right up close to my window!

Oxford, on the other hand, is so far exactly what I wanted it to be. The buildings are shorter, the birds are louder, and there is grass to lay in. Also, some castles and the Hogwarts dining hall. But, I’m really ready to just settle into school here. The tutorial system of education is new to me and I am greatly looking forward to experiencing it. I have also brought a half empty suitcase that I’m looking forward to filling with books!

 

 


Ashley Silver is a senior at the University of Missouri — Kansas City studying English Literature. Ashley will spend the summer semester abroad with the IFSA-Butler program in Oxford, England.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

What Even is Time?

I have no idea how long a month is. I mean, I know how long a month is. But I don’t know how long a month is. Time is weird and it doesn’t make sense to me. There are only three times: right now, the far off future, and never. Hence why I’m sitting in the airport writing this blog post like I should’ve done a week ago. My friends keep telling me a month is a really long time, that I’ll have SO much time to see EVERYTHING in England. I just keep telling them I have homework. Because, again, time is hard and I do not have a good grasp on how long a month is. Also, I’m taking 11 credits in one month, which genuinely seems like a lot. 

I know we are supposed to talk about our plane trips, but… ok so from MCI to Georgia was like, an hour and a half? And that’s how far my cousin’s house in Iowa is. So Georgia is a close as Iowa. The flight to England is 8hrs and that’s how far Colorado was, so England is like going to Estes Park for me. 

I guess what I’m getting at is: if you have a study abroad trip, don’t worry about how long you’ll be there or how far away from home it is. Time and distance are completely meaningless and incomprehensible. 


Ashley Silver is a senior at the University of Missouri — Kansas City studying English Literature. Ashley will spend the summer semester abroad with the IFSA-Butler program in Oxford, England.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Preparing for Abroad

The time is finally here. The time to pack up my bags, say goodbye to family and friends, and say hello to a new country and a new adventure. I have wanted to study abroad ever since my freshman year at UMKC, but now that the time is finally here, I am not sure what to think. See, up until this moment it has been a dream, a journey that always seemed far into the future. But now it is here, waiting for me to get on a plane, abandon my routine and comfortability, and open myself up to countless new adventures, new friends, and the opportunity to experience the world through a different lens; and for that, I couldn’t be more excited.

My name is Madison Keller, I am on the Pre-Medicine track at UMKC triple majoring in Chemistry, Psychology, and Spanish, and will be studying abroad for 6 weeks in Valencia, Spain to continue learning about the language and culture. I discovered Spanish in eighth grade during a world languages course and was hooked from the get go. I am now a senior at UMKC and have taken a Spanish course every year, for the last eight years. I know what you’re thinking, “wow, she must be fluent by now!” No… I am definitely not, but I am hoping that living in the country and being fully immersed in all aspects of the way of life in Spain will help push me toward my goal of fluency and increase my confidence in speaking the language with natives.

Image result for valencia spain map
I will be studying in Valencia, Spain!

On top of taking two courses in Valencia, one in grammar, and another in culture, I also have the opportunity to complete what is called an Independent Study on a topic of my choice for additional course credits at UMKC. Because I want to go into the medical field, I thought what better way to incorporate the two things I am passionate about; Medicine and Spanish! So, I will be researching the differences in the health care systems of the United States vs. Spain and narrowing in on mental health and emergency medicine. I will be conducting interviews with physicians and pharmacists, do a LOT of research and then compile it all into a minimum, 30 page paper! Seems like a lot, right?! Maybe so, but I can’t wait to get started learning. So, on top of hearing about my courses, the city, and all my adventures, you will also probably be hearing about my independent study and the progression of my research! So exciting!

This is my pup, Mowgli.. as you can see, he did not want me to pack for Spain.

Now, getting ready for this trip seems like it has taken me forever. Everyone says to “pack light”, but when you are leaving for 6 weeks, what does that even mean?! I have packed, re-packed, and re-re-packed like 4 times all in an effort in trying to “pack light” and I still don’t think I have done it as “light” as maybe it should be; but oh well. The hardest part in getting ready to leave the country though is not packing. It is saying goodbye to my pup, Mowgli. You see, he is VERY attached to me. Not seeing his dorky, hilarious, lovable personality and squeezing his face for six weeks is definitely the hardest part about leaving. He’s my rock and my best little friend so it wouldn’t feel right if I didn’t dedicate part of this post to him. But I have to take this once in a lifetime opportunity and I know he will be safe and happy while I am gone and get LOTS of love; even though all of that is WAY easier said than done and I am going to be crying like a baby when it’s time to leave.

While I am excited and a little uneasy about leaving, I know once I get there and settle in, I probably won’t want to come home. I think I am ready for this incredible journey in T-minus 2 days, and I am excited for you to follow along with me and my adventures! Let’s do this!

 


Madison Keller is a junior at the University of Missouri- Kansas City. She is on the pre-medicine track, triple majoring in Spanish, chemistry, and psychology. Madison will spend the summer abroad with the ISA Valencia, Spain Hispanic Studies Program. Madison’s career goals are to attend medical school and incorporate Spanish into all aspects of her life and career.

Disclaimer:  Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Volubilis

It was a rough ride on the bus, as hardly any of the roads are paved here, but I could not sit still for this particular bus ride anyway. My heart skipped a beat as I had finally stepped foot on to my first site of Roman Ruins. Right here in Morocco! We all know the greatness of what the Roman empire used to be but who would have thought, they too, were also in Morocco.

The city of Volubilis is over 2000 years old. Ancient history is my kind of thing, so of course, I wandered away from the group and tour guide. I got to see parts of the city the group didn’t get to and I don’t regret it! A slab of floor to what used to be a common place for people to gather and tell stories STILL had all the labors of Hercules intact, and in color. Running like a child with too much excitement I couldn’t help but believe I was touching and feeling all the columns and stones and carvings that the Romans created all those years ago. Some stones have a sea shell to represent Venus (Aphrodite in Greek). There were alters for Diane (goddess of the hunt) with the writing still on them! You could feel yourself step back in time and just imagine the everyday life in how fabulous this city used to be, and to me, still is.

The best part? Volubilis is only partly excavated. They say there are still many parts of the land to dig into, and our tour guide even said they are waiting for the day they find the Colosseum of the city.

It was in the 1st century BC and the 1st century AD that Volubilis became a flourishing center of the late Hellenistic culture. Annexed to Rome about AD 44, as a reward for supporting Rome during the revolt of Aedmon; Volubilis was made a municipium. (This means the people here had partial Roman citizenship.) This city became the head inland of the Roman province of Mauretania Tingitana. In the end, the town was deserted (in 285AD) when Diocletian reorganized it. In Arabic, the providence was known as Oulili or Walila. Volubilis then became the capital of Idris, within the Idrisid dynasty, after 788AD.

As my feet touched ground here and my hands touched the floor of the labors of Hercules, I could feel the carvings in the alters for Diane. I walked through what used to be a Pagan church. I sat down where animal sacrifices used to be made. I climbed the steps to overlook the town as the political officials used to do there. I walked through and discovered the origin of the steam bath, which are culturally known as Hammam baths. Overall, I was so thankful and heartfelt for this experience, that a single tear fell down the right side of my face.

Leaning up against the ancient wall near what seemed to be the old exit from the town, I raised my right hand to brush back my hair. A piece of the ancient wall chipped off of the stone and onto my knuckles. I took it as a sign.

And I will keep this piece of Volubilis with me, forever.

I’m sure it will last another 2000 years.

Kaylee at the Ancient Roman Ruins of Volubilis. Located in Morocco

Kaylee Tindle is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She is studying International Relations with a minor in Arabic. Kaylee will spend the semester abroad with the ISA Meknes, Morocco: Language, Culture and Society program. Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Kaylee is a United Sates Army veteran having served as a Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear specialist. Although her service in the military has ended, Kaylee still plans to serve the United States of America through the world of politics.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

From Soldier To Student

Being used to traveling all over the world, experiencing new cultures and ways of life hasn’t been too much of a challenge for me. From the barracks in the desert of Kuwait, to living in South Korea, and even experiencing life in Japan I would say the hardest culture shock was coming from active duty Army, most of my adult life thus far, to a full-time student who will be utilizing her knowledge and language skills abroad.

As a student who is learning the language of Arabic, I have chosen this path for personal, and professional reasonings. Along with my minor in Arabic I will be studying International Relations in the country of Morocco. This is a place I never thought I would be going to in-order to start utilizing my skills. There are magical places in the country I never thought I would have the opportunity to touch ground on. I have ISA and UMKC to thank for opening this door for me. With every new culture experience; I have been brought down to the earth further and more so recognized her people in all aspects of their lives and as I walk through the threshold and into the magical journey of my semester in Morocco, I will no longer land in combat boots, but in my everyday shoes. Ready to explore, and ready to learn.

The knowledge I will acquire will only be the beginning of what will be setting the rest of my life. From soldier to student, I will represent UMKC, ISA, and my country of USA with honor. Follow me on my journey, through my blog posts! As I love to share my experiences.

And so, until I return.

So long!

سنشتاق إليك

(sanashtaq ‘iilyka!)

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Kaylee Tindle is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. She is studying International Relations with a minor in Arabic. Kaylee will spend the semester abroad with the ISA Meknes, Morocco: Language, Culture and Society program. Originally from Kansas City, Missouri, Kaylee is a United Sates Army veteran having served as a Chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear specialist. Although her service in the military has ended, Kaylee still plans to serve the United States of America through the world of politics.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Ramadan Abroad

Amazing view from Christiansborg Palace

As Ramadan knocks on the door, cities worldwide light up and prepare for the month of fasting, but in Copenhagen life goes on as it normally would.  Ramadan is the ninth month in the Islamic calendar – it’s a time of fasting for Muslims. During this time food and drink are not allowed to be consumed from dawn to sunset. During the fast, we are not allowed to eat or drink anything. For me, during the summer back home, the fasts last for only 14-16 hours, but in Denmark, the sun sets close to 10 pm and rises at 4 am. That’s 20 hours of fasting during the hottest summer Demark has ever experienced.

When I applied for my study abroad program I didn’t really take into account that I was going to be spending Ramadan abroad, on my own, in the land where the sun never sets. I was really nervous about having to walk everywhere in the hot sun and I thought I was going to miss out on a lot of activities because of my lack of energy.

While traveling, it’s easy to become dehydrated when you’re not fasting, and even easier to do so while fasting. I made sure to hydrate plenty during the evening. I also made sure to take things slowly instead of trying to see all of Copenhagen at once. I realized that six weeks was more than enough time to sightsee and I made it a goal of mine to go sight-seeing at least three times out of the week and to do at least a couple of activities throughout the week. This allows me to enjoy my time without feeling drained. Fasting during my study abroad trip has definitely made this experience better.


Ruweida Kulane is a freshman at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Business Administration with an emphasis in Finance and Entrepreneurship. Ruweida is spending the summer abroad with DIS Study Abroad in Copenhagen, Denmark as a Gilman Scholar.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

The Journey Back Home

My last few days in Korea were somber, I was still having a great time with my friends but we all knew that our time together was quickly coming to an end. I began to reflect on my time studying abroad and how much of an impact that it had on my life. I did and saw some amazing things and I got to experience an international university that was both challenging and rewarding.

My last few days, I did not try to do new things to squeeze in an experience that I had yet to have. There were many things that I did not get to do while I was there and that was okay. Instead, I focused on doing the things that I was greatly going to miss; I went to my favorite cafes, hung out with my friends in our favorite bars, and ate my favorite foods. The smallest things that I did while there were the things I knew I was going to miss the most, because they had become a routine. I wasn’t going to miss going to the palaces, they were a tourist trip and I didn’t visit them every day. Instead, I was going to miss seeing the mountains when I walked to class, visiting my favorite beer and chicken place with my classmates, and going to the convenience store where I bought my cheap ramen that I had come to adore.

The idea of returning home was not easy. As I made my way onto the flight to come home I was distressed at how much I had come to love Korea. It was more than just a study abroad trip at this point; I had created a life for myself there and it was sad to let that go. No one tells you before you leave that coming back is just as hard, adjusting to life back in America is almost a reverse culture shock in itself, but it’s all part of the process and you just have to keep pushing through.


Emily Noe is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying History. Emily is spending the semester abroad with Dongguk University in Seoul, South Korea. Emily is working towards achieving her Bachelors, Masters, and Doctorate in history.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

When it’s over.

I had a life changing experience while abroad.  It was fun, stressful, exciting, exhausting, and everything in between.  Once I was finished with my 6 week program at Charles University two of my closest and oldest friends met up with me.  I took my first night train!

Sleeper cars are really cramped…

We spent three weeks traveling through Southeastern Europe and ended up in Italy.

Life at home isn’t this exciting.

The last few days of my three week adventure I spent alone in Rome and in Naples.  I definitely recommend solo travel.  I was able to go see the sights at my own pace and I was forced to speak up in situations where I’d usually let my travel buddies step in.

I found the Trevi Fountain all by myself!

Even though I went through bouts of homesickness while abroad, I’m sad to be home.  I wasn’t prepared to feel like this, but I hear it’s normal.  To fight by coming home blues I am keeping myself busy by meeting with all of the friends who missed me while I was gone.  Every so often I look at pictures from my trip and dream of returning to Italy and Croatia.  Aside from the sadness I feel a new sense of who I am and what I want out of life.  Something I want is more travel!  Next on my list is Japan 2018!  Thank you UMKC for letting me have this experience!


Lauren Higgins is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Physics with emphasis in Astronomy.  Lauren is spending the summer abroad at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

ROMA

ITALIAAAAA
La bandiera italiana

Il Colosseo / the Colosseum
La via para il Colosseo / The street to the Colosseum

Después de que el programa había terminado, me fui para Italia; yo volé de Madrid a Roma, la capital de Italia. Roma es una ciudad muy antigua y muy histórica. Había muchas vistas, mucha historia y mucha cultura para ver; vi tres vistas muy famosas – primer el Colosseo, después la fuente de Trevi, después Las escaleras españolas. Que bonito era todo por Roma, era como Nueva York pero con más historia. Italiano es bastante como Español que pude comprenderlo un poco, pero es bastante diferente que no pude comprenderlo muchas veces (jejeje). Yo pasé dos días allí, pero es tan gigante que no tuve el tiempo para explorar todo. Estudié la lengua latina en la escuela secundaria y me emocionaba mucho visitar esta ciudad de que había oído tanto por los años. Hacía mucho calor allí. La plaza de España era muy bella y había una bandera gigante allí, otra cosa que me alegraba ver. Mis dos amores europeos en un lugar. 🙂

IL COLOSSEO La fontana di Trevi

After the program had finished, I left for Italy; I flew from Madrid to Rome, the capital of Italy. Rome is a very old and very historic city. There were many sights, a lot of history and a lot of culture to see; I saw three famous sights – first the Colosseum, then the Trevi fountain, then the Spanish steps. How beautiful was everything, it was like New York but with more history. Italian is enough like Spanish that I managed to understand a little, but it’s different enough that I do not manage many times (LOL). I spent two days there, pero it’s so huge that I did not have time to explore everything. I studied Latin in high school and it was exciting me to visit this city that I had heard so much about over the years. It was really hot there. The plaza of Spain was very beautiful and there was a huge Spanish flag there, another thing that I was excited to see. My two European loves in one place. 🙂

Le Scale Spagnole / The Spanish steps
La fontana di Trevi / the Trevi fountain

 

Os veré luego, amigos. Hasta pronto. N8
I will see y’all later, friends. Until soon. Natagnél


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Goodbye Spain!

Currently, I’m sitting in a very uncomfortable chair in the Madrid Airport waiting for my plane to arrive. I’m going home ya’ll! As amazing as this trip to Spain was, I am so ready to be home and eat chipotle in air conditioning. I feel like living in a different country should have been tougher than it was, but I think I had such a good support group in both my host family and friends that I never really got too homesick. And thanks to Facetime I could talk to my boyfriend whenever I wanted! As far as my Spanish goes, I would say that I definitely understand better and I can get by in conversations with a few key phrases. Personally, I think I learned more at my host family’s house and walking around Granada than I did at school. In class everything is structured and organized, but when you’re having dinner with your family there is no outline or slideshow. You jump around and make jokes. The dinner table was where my Spanish was tested the most.

I finished off my month and a half stay with a trip to Valencia with some friends. We took the overnight bus on the last day of classes and stayed for the past 4 days. There, we visited 2 vineyards, went to the beach, and walked around downtown. It was a perfect way to end the summer!

I would 100% recommend that everyone study abroad in college. Is there any other time in your future that you think you could live in a foreign country for a semester long? Eventually, we’re all going to get “real” jobs and only be able to travel for a week or 2 at a time. So pick up a few extra shifts, cut back on the Starbucks, make it work, and take the leap. No one ever regrets the adventures they take. I sure don’t.


Megan Schwindler is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying English Literature and Spanish. Megan is spending the summer abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.