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A Castle (or 4) Fit for a Princess

I mentioned in my first blog post how I was excited to see all the castles in Scotland and I have not been disappointed. I have seen castles of all ranges from ones in ruins to ones their full glory. Each time I see a castle I get very excited and wish I could be a princess who lived in these castles. All of them were placed a top a hill with a beautiful, scenic background. They stood with elegance and grace that cannot be replicated (although I will try to with my pictures).

I was on the streets of Edinburgh looking up at the Edinburgh Castle when I took this picture.

The first castle I saw was the Edinburgh Castle. It is massive and sits high above everything else in Edinburgh. So high, that if you get lost all you have to do is find the castle, start walking in that direction and you will be back in familiar territory. This rings true as I did manage to get lost (numerous times) and was able to find my way back by walking towards the massive castle. When I found out you could actually go in the castle, I was ecstatic.  It was as breathtaking from the outside as it was from the inside. It was all made of stone and had perfectly manicured lawns inside the castle. Inside the castle were various other buildings you could go into that displayed historic pieces from the castle. The best part was I got to see the Crown Jewels! I wish they would have let me wear the crown…

The view from the top of Edinburgh Castle.
This building was inside the Edinburgh Castle!

 

All that is left of the Dunrue Castle. It sits on top of a hill. It is surrounded on three sides by land and the other, the ocean.

Another castle I went to was the Dunure Castle in Dunrue, Scotland. This castle was in ruins but what was left of it was preserved. This meant I got to go inside and climb around on the rocks. I even got to look out what was once a window and see the ocean spread out before me. I also got to climb up the stairs to the upper level and see the view from here. I can only imagine how grand this castle once looked. The environment around the ocean was calm and quiet. Nothing else was around except the castle and the ocean. I wish I could have stayed here all day. This was one of my favorite castles because I got to freely explore without worrying about any fragile artifacts that could possibly break. There were no guidelines or restrictions on where I could go so I went everywhere!  It was just me and my classmates having the time of our lives exploring this exquisite castle.

I was standing on a rock near the shore line when I took this picture. The castle is behind me and the ocean spread out before me. You could smell the salt in the air from the ocean.
This is the view from the window I found.
I had to sit in front of the window because it was just that cool.

During my last week in Scotland, the group took a bus tour up to the Isle of Harris and then back down towards Glasgow. Along the way, we also stopped at Eilean Donan Castle in Wester Ross, Scotland. It was a 15 minute stop to go to the bathroom and take pictures and then we would be back on the road. This had to be one of my favorite castles even though I wasn’t there for long. I really wish I had a tiara and a pretty dress to take my pictures in front of the castle (I know, I’m that girl). There was a long bridge that leads up to the castle and is the only entrance into it. This is because the castle was built on a peninsula so the other three sides were surrounded by water. Behind the castle was various mountains with the clouds hovering over them. It was a beautiful sight to see. I wish we had had more time here so I could see what the inside of the castle looked like. The bus driver/tour guide Rich told a story about the castle. I don’t remember all the names and dates but essentially the castle was burned down and many years down the road a family heir wanted to rebuild the castle. He

This is one of my favorite pictures I took on my trip. I love how you can see the castle, the mountains in the background, the bridge leading to the castle, the water surrounding it and the land.

had never seen what the castle used to look like or had any blue prints so he made it based on an image he had in his head. Later, a hidden room was found in the Edinburgh Castle that held the blue prints for a majority of the castles in Scotland, including the Eilean Donan Castle. It turns out that the rebuilt castle was a 95% accurate match to the original! Who would have guessed!?

 

Of course, I had to take a picture with the castle. Now if only I had a tiara…
I took this picture of Stilring from the bus as we were driving up to it.

The last castle I saw was on my last day in Scotland. It was the Stirling Castle in Stirling, Scotland. I was

This walkway was inside of the Stirling Castle and looked over the gardens.

there for about two hours and ran around in pure joy. Some parts of the castle were a museum with artifacts displayed while other parts were empty rooms that you could crawl around in. I liked how I could walk around and touch the walls of the castle and be in rooms you aren’t normally let into. It felt like there was some mystery to the room by it being empty. I could only imagine what it once looked like, who had been in these rooms, and what had occurred here. I was enthralled and felt like a little kid in a candy store. I enjoyed my time running around the castle and seeing everything that was there.

 

This was inside some of the rooms I got to crawl around in. All the rooms were made of stone and had small windows cut out of them to let in light.
I was so excited to be in a castle! It had been a few weeks since I last visited one.
This was inside the castle in the gardens.
An outfit a Queen and King used to wear. There are many layers to these outfits that can’t be seen from the outside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you find a castle (or four) along your journeys fit enough for a princess (or prince).

-Nicole Wilhelm


Nicole Wilhelm is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. Nicole is spending the month of July in many different cities in Scotland with the UMKC Honors College Program in Scotland. Nicole is involved in UMKC’s Campus Ambassadors, Swim and Dive Club, BHS Society, and Student Nursing Association.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Change of Scenery

Last weekend I took a trip to St. Andrews and Dundee with my professor and two flatmates. It felt nice to get out for the weekend and explore uncharted territory. St. Andrews is a much smaller town than Edinburgh. I enjoyed getting away from the hustle of the city for a while. I got to walk on the beach at St. Andrews, visit a castle, and go to a medieval church. On the beach, there was a sandcastle competition going on. Families were busy making their own castles while the ruins of St. Andrew’s castle was just a walk away. My favorite part was exploring the church ground with its towering façade and old gravestones. In its prime the church had been huge – a monumental building to be reckoned with. There was also a ghost of a woman that supposedly haunted the grounds, but sadly I did not see her.

St. Andrews’s Beach
St. Andrews

 

 

 

 

 

 

After spending the day in St. Andrews, we headed to

Dundee. The city had a completely different feeling than Edinburgh. It was compromised of mostly college students and seemed to be on the rebound from a poor economic state. I was able to visit both of the city’s art museums, and I was surprised at how good their collections were. I discovered a story about two Scottish women that travelled the globe in the 1900s to report on the conditions of women from around the world. I thought the art museum was very inclusive and had a lot of information to offer.

 

Claire Woods: Victim of Geography

 


 Samantha Bradfield is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Psychology and Art History.  Samantha is spending the summer abroad with the UMKC Honors Summer Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Ya los exámenes finales

¡PURA LOCURA! Yo apenas puedo creer que este viaje por España y el tiempo en Granada han pasado tan rápidamente. Os escribo mientras estudio los sujetos nuevos para prepararme para los exámenes finales. Me sigue sintiendo que acabe de llegar, pero claro, esto no es el caso. Ya he estado en Europa por un mes y medio y tengo más vistas y más países para ver por las semanas que vengan antes de regresar. ¿Quién sepa de dónde os escribiré pronto? Se ha dicho que el mundo es ostra; pues, me parece que es tiempo para comer más mariscos. =P

Esperando la suerte,

Natagnél


PURE MADNESS! I can hardly believe that this trip around Spain and the time in Granda have passed so quickly. I write to y’all while I am studying the new subjects to prepare myself for the final exams. I still feel like I just arrived, but clearly, this is not the case. I have already been in Europe for a month & a half and I have more sights and more countries to see in the coming weeks before coming back. Who knows where I’ll write to y’all soon? It has been said that the world is an oyster; well, it’s seems to me that it’s time for some more seafood. =P

Hoping for luck,

Nate


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

UP….UP…. AND YOU ARE IN THE HIGHLANDS

The ocean

Want to know the most beautiful place on planet earth? It is the Highlands of Scotland! Greenery surrounds you almost everywhere you look and the water is restless, but stunning.

Just a small glimpse into the beautiful Highlands

There is always a hanging mist in the Highlands in Scotland and I admit it is really cold here, but if you bundle up and brave the cold it is a sight worth seeing. We took a boat into the Highlands and I have never been on a cruise ship, but that is what I imagined it would look like. It was huge and luxurious with a cafe. I was able to relax for a little bit and enjoy the ocean. On this trip to the highlands we are visiting the Isle of Lewis and the Isle of Harris. There are many monuments here and the start of our journey in the highlands we went to the Butt of Lewis. You read that right. I said the Butt of Lewis (don’t google or you may get some weird images). It is the end of the Island of Lewis and there are cliffs high up that we got to look off and stare at the ocean. I stared at the sea gulls circle around trying to get the fish and there was a seal popping his head out of the water daring the sea gulls to come closer. The water crashed into the rocks angrily and the vastness of the ocean is enough to make the largest person feel small.

There was a lighthouse behind the cliffs and it was everything I imagined it would be. I felt at home here and never wanted to leave. But we made our way back to our Hostel for the night where nine of the girls in my class here all stay in a hostel room together. It was so much fun, it felt like a slumber party! The next morning we had class things to clear up, so we gave our speeches in the hostel. This trip has taught us all how to be flexible and roll with the punches! It has been a very fun experience seeing what our journey will bring us next. The second day we made our way to the Isle of Harris where we stopped at an old town where we learned how tweed blankets and scarves are made. It was interesting to watch and the people there were very kind. A nice man explained everything to us and left nothing but happy feelings in my heart. I will definitely be visiting that town again.

The mighty and powerful stones

Next, we made our way to the Calanais stones which were tall, mighty, and mysterious. These stones are mysterious and no one knows exactly why there are there. After the stones we made our way to the beach and at the beach I got to see a HIGHLAND COW (pronounced coo). If you have been following my blogs you know I am a farm girl and all I wanted this whole trip was to see a Highland cow and get a picture with it! I finally got it and my dreams have been fulfilled.

My baby Highland cow. I FINALLY GOT A PICTURE!!

We then made our way back to the hostel and all in all. The highlands were pretty amazing. As always, may adventure find you… even if it is so far north that it doesn’t get dark at night.


Kylie Wilson is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. She is spending the summer term abroad with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland. Kylie is from small town Helena, Missouri and hopes to be a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit nurse in the future. She has a pet cow named Betsy whom she loves dearly.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Granada, Granada, Granada

 

Buen consejo / Good advice, “That which is chaos for the fly is normal for the spider.”

Hola amigos,

Hemos estado en Granada por un rato ahora.  Esta ciudad, aunque es muy antigua, me recuerda de Kansas City — es gran ciudad pequeña. Es muy fácil moverse por la ciudad andando. El grupo vio la Alhambra, que gigante!!! En la alhambra, había las tres banderas de Granada – de la ciudad de Granada, de la región de Andalucía, y de España. (ved las banderas abajo) Este sol andaluz lleva toda la energía y se necesitan muchas comida y agua para sustentarse. 😛 Encima una cierta colina, se existe el Mirador de San Nicolás, cual puede dar una vista buena de la Alhambra, así que yo saqué una foto 😉 el camino desde del centro de la ciudad hasta el mirador era un gran viaje por las colinas.

La Alhambra del Mirador de San Nicolás / the Alhambra from the Lookout of Saint Nicholas

 


 

Escudo de Granada / the Crest of Granada

Hello friends,

We’ve been in Granada for a while now. This city, although it is really old, reminds me of Kansas City — it’s a little big city. It is really easy to get around the city walking. The group saw the Alhambra, how giant!!!!!! In the Alhambra, there were the three flags of Granada – the city of Granada, the region of Andalusia, & of Spain. (See the flags below) This Andalusian sun takes all your energy and a lot of food and water are needed to survive. 😛 On top of this certain hill, there is the Lookout of Saint Nicholas, which can give a great view of the Alhambra, so I took a photo 😉 the way from the city center to the lookout was a big trip through the hills.

 

Las banderas / The flags | Andalucía/Andalusia, España/Spain, & Granada

Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

The Wheels on the Bus go ‘Round and ‘Round (and so does my stomach)

Most people get home sick when they study abroad, I, however, managed to get extremely bus sick.

It was the end of the first week of classes and my professors planned a bus trip out to the Scottish borders to see Sir Walter Scott’s House,

I also took this on the bus ride to the Scottish Borders. I was captivated by the arches and grace of the bridge.

Kelso Abbey and Jedburgh Abbey. I was excited to get out of the city for a day and see what the countryside had to offer. Bright and early Friday morning, I hopped on the bus and grabbed a window seat ready to start this adventure. The tour guide, named Doogie, was hilarious and set the mood for an exciting and fun day. I was giddy in my seat and could hardly sit still. My eyes never drifted from the window for fear I would miss something. Scotland really does have a vast landscape of rolling green hills, sheep and cows wandering about and a scattering of tall trees scattered about.

I took this picture of the country side on the bus ride to the Scottish Borders. This was the typical scene in this part of Scotland.

I felt great until the trees started to sway and then I realized I was doing the swaying. I wanted to close my eyes and get my bearings but the desired to see everything won out and I was compelled to look out the window again. The bus took a sharp turn and we started going down a squiggly road. My stomach didn’t feel very attached to the rest of me at this point. Yet, silly and stubborn me still wanted to look out the window. I told myself, you’re only in Scotland once, you have to see everything. You can close your eyes tonight when you go to bed.

On the way to the last stop of the day, the Jedburgh Abbey, the thick air was warm and suffocating. Pressing against me each time a tried to draw in a long, deep breath. My head felt like it was spinning and may just pop off at any moment. My body numb to the vibration of the bus underneath me. My stomach recoiling, not happy that it was being disrupted. I tried to take in another deep breath. I would not throw up. I would not throw up. I was determined to keep it together because throwing up on a bus is one of those things that will follow you for the rest

The Jedburgh Abbey is the most intact Abbey left standing. Even in ruins, this building is still beautiful and magnificent.

of your life. Suddenly, the bus lurched to a stop. I was at my destination, the Jedburgh Abbey. Just in time. Every so slowly I stood up and grabbed the seat next to me for support. I walked off the bus like a toddler who had just taken his first steps. Ah, solid ground. Clean, crisp fresh air!

I thought I would feel better after this but I was wrong. I was still swaying and my stomach was trying to creep its way out of my body. I felt so sick. I forced myself to see everything at each stop but by the end, I was dragging. My classmates and professors noticed I wasn’t looking too good. I tried to play it off like it wasn’t a big deal as I didn’t want to make it a big deal. However, you can only try and downplay bus sickness so much when you’re pale as a ghost and look like you might pass out at any moment.

As a typical American, I had to take a selfie. This was in front of the Jedburgh Abbey. Try not to look too closely, I’m looking a little rough around the edges.

I was told to sit down and drink some water. My fellow classmates concerned but still trying to keep their distance in case my stomach decided to show itself. Some motion sickness medicine was found for me before I got back on the bus and I got the honor of sitting next to Doogie on the ride back. He seemed a bit skeptical at first for fear he would get thrown up on. However, the ride back was much better and I managed to keep it together. I didn’t try and see all the scenery this time around, which probably helped. I managed to make it back in one piece and spent the rest of the night regaining the last of my bearings.

The lesson of this trip is to always remember to take motion sickness medicine before getting on a bus. Lucky for me, I now have sixteen people who are going to help remind me to take them. Not to mention, the seat at the very front of the bus has now been designated to me. It is one of those things that I will never live down. I have already been reminded to take motion sickness medicine before the next bus trip, which is a few days away I might add. If my stomach contents do make an appearance on this next trip I promise there will be no pictures.

Good luck and I hope adventure finds you with no motion sickness.

-Nicole Wilhelm


Nicole Wilhelm is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. Nicole is spending the month of July in many different cities in Scotland with the UMKC Honors College Program in Scotland. Nicole is involved in UMKC’s Campus Ambassadors, Swim and Dive Club, BHS Society, and Student Nursing Association.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

España vs. Me: Round Two

The history and culture shock of Spain continued down its path with me as I began to more fully comprehend the  amazing accomplishments that took place in the last five thousand years or more.

La Granja Royal Palace was an interesting find on our tour throughout Spain. Just outside the small town of San Ildefonso, the summer palace and its gardens were a wonderful delight that I did not think any king would ever want. The 1,500 acres of gardens, trees, groves, and amazing flowerbeds and fountains were stunning.

A flower bed of the La Granja gardens.
A view looking down at one of the main fountains at the garden.

The most incredible thing was how the king had Red Woods shipped from the United States to Spain just so he could have them in the garden. The fountains and architectures were modeled after Versailles, and I found it interesting how the palace now belongs to the people and that they are allowed to visit inside of it. The garden continues to grow all of the original species of plants that were originally planted, and the palace itself contains all of the original furniture and architecture from its original conception as well.

The Mezquita that we had the welcomed pleasure of seeing is the ultimate symbol of how the three cultures of Spain, Jewish, Moor, and Christian, came together and completely redeveloped a new mosque-cathedral as new kings ruled over the area.

View of one of the old entrances to the Mezquita of Córdoba, Spain.

Though the mezquita is mainly a representation of the Moor and Christian cultures, I believe that the history behind it was influenced by all three cultures, even if it wasn’t at the same time. Each chapel represents a different part of the religions and I found most fascinating the pillars that were inscribed with different meanings.

A neighborhood of the “Village of Three Cultures”.

Frigiliana is a town that takes the time to celebrate the Festival de las Tres Culturas (Festival of Three Cultures) at the end of August. This festival commemorates the coexistence between the Christian, Muslim and Jewish traditions, as well as the regions historic confluence.

One of the most pure colored houses of the “White Village”.

This special town, also known as the “White Village” inspired me to find the time during this study abroad trip and visit it again. Though I did not like all of the stairs that we had to climb, this white village full of artists and flowers was the push I needed to continue my journey through the Spanish culture and the Spanish Language.


Grace Englehart is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Creative Writing and Spanish. Grace is spending the summer term abroad with the faculty-led UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

España vs. Me: Round One

España has displaced my mind from my life and has put it inside of my history books and National Geographic Magazine issues that I praised as a child.

Throughout my first week in Spain, I was shown that no matter how ‘small’ she may be compared to the states or other European countries, the people and history of the Iberia Peninsula have stolen the empty spaces of my mind and have replaced them with all of her glories and wonders. Madrid became the city of maze-like buildings that trapped me, only to show me the history inside of each maze turn. Interestingly, the street names in Spain are placed on the sides of buildings, so I found myself looking up a lot and missing the sights of the streets below.

A memorial text for Cervantes, reading: To Don Miguel de Cervantes, on the fourth century of the publication of the first part of Don Quijote.
One of my favorite streets to get lost on: Calle de Cervantes

The first night I spent in Madrid left me puzzled and restless because I knew that I could not possibly learn a culture by its language or history alone.

As the night went on, my mind began to rest and the morning of our trip to Segovia awakened the adventure I did not think I could have on a study abroad trip.

One of my life-altering fears shattered: Heights

It is amazing to have encountered one of the most magnificent structures from the Roman times that is still standing and still being used today. I have spent years in history classes, reading and studying the use the Roman Aqueducts, but I have never imagined how intense their presence may be until I saw them for myself.

My first impression of the Aqueduct of Segovia: How is history alive in front of me?

Since they were built without any mortar, the thirty-six semi-circular arches blew me away. Ironically, I was almost afraid to climb the stairs and see the view from the top of them, but thankfully the history behind the entire structure gave me the confidence to take the climb.

My history book selfie.

The Plaza de España is one of my favorite outdoor descriptions of history that I have experienced thus far on our trip (besides the Mezquita and the beautiful town of Frigiliana). The plaza is in the Parque de Maria Luisa in Seville, Spain. It was built for an exposition is 1929 and is an example of Regionalism Architecture, meaning that it mixes elements of the Renaissance and the Moorish revival styles of Spanish architecture. Essentially, it’s a Neo- Mudéjar style.

View of the Plaza from the far right.

The half-circle complex contains four bridges representing the four kingdoms of Spain. Inside the semi-circle are tiled alcoves that represent each province of Spain. Out of the forty-eight alcoves, everyone has a relevant tableau and map that gives a representation of the history of that said province. This in an amazing and beautiful piece of tiled architecture because it not only gives a historical aspect of each province and the four kingdoms, but of how the culture and people reflect on each other.


Grace Englehart is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Creative Writing and Spanish. Grace is spending the summer term abroad with the faculty-led UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

What’s in a name? A LOT!!!

Mientras he viajado por Iberia, he encontrado muchos nombres, más complejos que justo de la nacionalidad. Por supuesto, hay adjetivos como Portugués, Español, y Francés pero mis viajes por España me han aprendido mucho. España es un país muy regional – como los Estados Unidos. Se existen términos muy básicos para referir a alguien y de donde viene esa persona, como Estadounidense o Español; ellos son términos extensos que faltan una descripción verdadera. Creo que términos como ¨Nueva yorquino¨ o “Misurense” funcionen mejor para describir a alguien. Se describe mejor el personaje de la persona. ¡Vamos a mirar a unos pocos de los términos que he encontrado! (Por supuesto, las forms masculinas y femeninas)

While I’ve traveled through Iberia, I have found many names, more complex than just of nationality. Of course, there are adjectives like Portuguese, Spanish, and French but my travels through Spain have taught me a lot. Spain is a very regional country – like the USA. There are very basic terms to refer to someone and where they come, like American or Spanish; they are broad terms that lack a true description. I think that terms like “New Yorker” or “Missourian” work better to describe someone. The personality of the person is best described. Let’s look at a few of the terms that I’ve found! (Of course, the masculine and feminine forms)

Términos extensos / vast terms

  • Spanish – español, española (from Spain)
  • Portuguese – portugués, portuguesa (from Portugal)
  • French – francés, francesa (from France)
  • German – alemán, alemana (from Germany)
  • Italian – italiano, italiana (from Italy)

Nombres regionales / regional names

  • Castilian – castellano, castellana (from Castile)
  • Catalan – catalán, catalana (from Catalonia)
  • Basque – vasco, vasca (from Basque country)
  • Valencian – valenciano, valenciana (from Valencia)
    • [from the city Alicante – alicantino, alicantina <3]
  • Andalusian – andaluz, andaluza (from Andalusia)
  • Galician – gallego, gallega (from Galicia)

Me interesa saber por que algunos de estos términos (de rojo) faltan las vocales finales de las formas masculinas si todas las formas femeninas tienen las finales A’s. ¡Yo supongo que más estudios vengan!

I’m interested to know why some of these terms (in red) lack the final vowels in the masculine forms if all the feminine forms have the final A’s. I guess more studies are coming!

Hasta pronto / Until soon,

Natagnél / Nate

Feliz Julio / Happy July


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

El Paseo por Andalucía ;)

Andalucía es una de las más grandes comunidades autónomas en el país entero, con una cultura muy distinta y su propio acento. España fue un país de guerra entre los católicos y los moros por siglos y Andalucía fue el centro de estas batallas porque fue el central área entre Europa y Africa norteña. En los días de hoy, todavía se existen dos pequeñas colonias españolas en Marruecos, Ceuta y Melilla. Andalucía me emocionaba porque he querido visitar Sevilla por mucho tiempo y por fin, tenía la casualidad. ¡Vamos a mirar!

Andalusia is one of the biggest autonomous communities in the whole country, with a very distinct culture and its own accent. Spain was a country of war between the Catholics and the Moors for centuries and Andalusia was the center of these battles because it is the central area between Europe and northern Africa. In today’s days, there are still two small Spanish colonies in Morocco, Ceuta & Melilla. Andalusia was exciting me because I have wanted to visit Seville for a while and at last, I had the chance. Let’s take a look!

Plaza de España

En Andalucía, la primera ciudad que visitamos fue Sevilla. ¡Que alegría que íbamos a visitar la ciudad hermana de mi ciudad, KCMO! Por supuesto, me aseguré ponerme una camiseta sin mangas de KCMO. En Sevilla, primero visitamos la Plaza de América, con los jardines y las fuentes. El siguiente lugar que vistamos fue la Plaza de España. Un gran área con un altar de cada provincia de España. ¡Que bonita era la Plaza! No sólo yo tuve memorias de KCMO y la plaza allá, sino encontré un altar de Alicante también –  mi primer amor español.

Plaza de América

In Andalusia, the first city that was visited was Seville. What joy I had that we were going to visit the sister city of KCMO! Of course, I made sure to wear a KCMO tank top. In Seville, first we visited the Plaza of America, with the gardens and the fountains. The next place that was visited was the Plaza of Spain. A great area with a shrine for each province of Spain. How beautiful was the Plaza! Not only did I have memories of KCMO and the plaza there, but I found an altar to Alicante too – my first Spanish love.

la Catedral de Córdoba

Después de ver las vistas en Sevilla, nos fuimos para Córdoba. En esta ciudad, vi la catedral cordobesa, un edificio de mucho lujo y una historia muy compleja. Al igual que en Andalucía en general, esta ciudad se cambió del control de los moros al control de los católicos unas veces – estos cambios se reflejan de los estilos de la catedral. Hay una parte de un estilo muy árabe, con los arcos entre las columnas, cual funcionaba como una mezquita en una época. Esta parte entonces se conectó con una parte muy lujosa, de un estilo muy europeo. En esta parte, había muchas reliquias muy lujosas de plata y de oro. Era una estructura fascinanate.

Los arcos de la catedral cordobesa
Las reliquias lujosas cordobesas de la catedral

After seeing the sights in Seville, we left for Cordoba (sometimes written Cordova). In this city, we saw the cathedral of Cordoba, a building with so many luxuries and a very complicated history. As in Andalusia in general, this city was changed from the control of the Moors to the control of the Catholics a few times – these changes are reflected in the styles of the cathedral. There is a part with a very Moorish style, with the arches between the columns, which was functioning as a mosque at a time. This part was then connected with a very luxurious part, of a very European style. In this part, there were many very luxurious artifacts of silver and of gold. It was a fascinating building.

FRIGILIANA

Después de ver Córdoba, nos fuimos para la costa. Nosotros entonces vimos unas ciudades por la costa sureña de España – Andalucía ocupa casi toda la costa sureña ibérica, otra de la costa portuguesa y la costa de Murcia. Llegamos a la ciudad de Torremolinos primero – donde nos quedamos por tres días. Torremolinos me hizo pensar en Florida, me pareció como el estado, con las playas y estaba muy cerca del mar. Por el segundo día, vimos tres más ciudades andaluzas – Málaga, Frigiliana, y Almuñécar. Frigiliana es una ciudad del estilo muy clásicamente mediterráneo – casas blancas por la colinas.

TORREMOLINOS

After seeing Cordoba, we left for the coast We then saw some cities along the coast of southern Spain – Andalusia occupies almost the whole southern Iberian coast, other than the Portuguese coast and the coast of Murcia. We arrived to the city of Torremolinos first – where we stayed for 3 days. Torremolinos made me think about Florida, it seemed to me like the state. For the second day, we saw three more Andalusian cities – Málaga, Frigiliana, y Almuñécar. Frigiliana was a city with a very classically Mediterranean style, white houses through the hills.

El tiempo que ha pasado fue maravilloso. Apenas puedo esperar pasar más aquí.

The time that has passed was wonderful. I can barely wait to spend more here.

—Nate.

Chico Veinticinco

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.