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Creating Your Own Study Abroad Experience

Maybe you’ve seen that beautiful study abroad brochure chalk full of stunning images and you’re ready to leave tomorrow; maybe you’re on the fence, not sure if study abroad is right for you; or maybe you are just reading this post because you are curious and know nothing about it. Wherever you are on this spectrum, this post is for you.

We all have our own ideas about what study abroad is. After all, a two hundred-word pamphlet certainly leaves a lot to your imagination. So in light of this, I would like to share some of my personal study abroad experiences in an effort to give you a little more information and advice about studying abroad in general.

Let me start by saying, the “study” in “study abroad” definitely shouldn’t be ignored. I was in school a lot more than I thought I would be. Monday through Friday, I went to school at the University of Belgrano from 9:30am to 2:30pm, and three days a week I had class with a UMKC faculty member for about two hours each day. That’s a lot of time! However, it was justified and time well spent. I received nine credit hours of upper level Spanish in just six short weeks, so it makes sense I was in class for so long. I also learned a ton of Spanish, which is what I set out to do in the first place.

Takeaway: Weigh the amount of credit hours you are receiving with what your goals are for studying abroad. If you’re looking for a fun time getting to know another culture, maybe a three or six credit hour program is for you. If you’re looking for a big increase in your language learning abilities, maybe a more intense, nine or twelve credit hour program is for you.

Another important aspect of a study abroad experience is the location. I’m studying abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina – one of Latin America’s largest and most densely populated cities. One of the fun parts of being in a big city is that there is so much to do. People who have lived here their entire life have yet to do half the things the city has to offer. One of the down sides of living in a large city is that cultural differences from one large city to another are pretty small. On the surface, it would be pretty hard to tell New York City and Buenos Aires apart.

Takeaway: There is a lot more to a location than the beautiful views it has to offer. Think about the city’s size, geographic location, and position in the global society before making a choice about where you’ll go.

What about duration? My program took place in the summer and lasted a total of six weeks. Four weeks I spent immersed in Spanish classes and the other two were spent traveling and doing my own thing. As my trip comes to an end, I am so happy I had those two extra weeks outside of class; it’s where I really got out and experienced Argentina! Personally, I felt like six weeks was a perfect amount of time away, and the traveling in the summer allowed me to take less of a serious pause on my life.

Takeaway: Think about how long you are willing to be away from home; going on this trip I realized just how important my family, friends and life in general were to me. Additionally, I would highly recommend a program that gives you some free time.

All in all, studying abroad is definitely a worthwhile experience no matter what program you choose, where you go, or how long you are away. I guarantee you will have the experience of a lifetime!


Sam Nelson is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City majoring in Psychology and Economics with a minor in Spanish. Sam will study abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina during Summer of 2018 with hopes of improving his Spanish language skills. He is a member of Pride Alliance and several other student organizations. After Sam completes his degree at UMKC, he plans to attend graduate school and earn his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

A New Place and New Ideas

I have been living abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina for a good two weeks now, and – wow – so much is different here. At first it took a lot of getting used to. Here, I take public transportation everywhere, and it is not uncommon to have to walk over a mile to get to my destination. I don’t really eat breakfast – the United States is seen as eating a gloriously huge breakfast in many parts of the world, if you wanted to know. I don’t eat dinner until 10pm, but every dinner is the size of a Thanksgiving meal. And, perhaps most shockingly, if I want to go out on the weekends, that means I am getting to the club at 2am and not leaving until 5.

One thing different here that I particularly enjoy is the insane amount of political involvement everyone has. I bet the average porteño (that’s what the people of Buenos Aires call themselves) knows more about United States politics than you do! Within the first weeks of me being here, there was a nationwide strike demanding the government do something about the nation’s poor economic conditions; the whole city shut down, shops closed, public transportation was unavailable, and the streets were eerily empty. That’s something you just don’t see in the United States – although I will say the average American’s political involvement seems to be increasing exponentially over the past few years. Mine certainly has!

A protest I happened upon while touring the city center

Along with politics, everyone here seems to be extremely passionate about everything, and they are more than willing to share their opinions. In the spirit of heated discourse, I decided to ask my host parents a loaded question at the dinner table one night: your city has such a beautiful culture, what do you think about these McDonald’s and Starbuck’s popping up around your neighborhood? Do you feel like aspects of American culture are invading yours? I braced myself, ready for an explosively passionate answer… and I got nothing.

“What do you mean, invading a culture?” I was surprised. This is a very heated topic in the US right now, and it seemed for once my host dad was indifferent. He went on to explain how Buenos Aires is full of all types of people; people have been immigrating here from all over the world for years. These stores, to him, were merely another additional place to get coffee or a quick bite to eat.

Most importantly in his response was the idea of “additional”. None of the things finding their way to Buenos Aires were viewed as taking away from what was already here. Although he is only one person and can’t represent every person from Buenos Aires, he did make me think: where did we, in the US, get the idea that things coming into the states are invasive? Why are they seen as a subtraction from what we already have and not as something additional?

 


Sam Nelson is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City majoring in Psychology and Economics with a minor in Spanish. Sam will study abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina during Summer of 2018 with hopes of improving his Spanish language skills. He is a member of Pride Alliance and several other student organizations. After Sam completes his degree at UMKC, he plans to attend graduate school and earn his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

A Day in The Life

In Cusco, people tend to start their days a little later than I am used to back at home, at least in the professional world. In our home here, we wake up and have breakfast every morning at 7:15 am and then we all get ready to head out for the day. For me this means waiting around for an hour or so before heading to my dental clinic that opens at 9 am.

 

Photo of the dental clinic

When I first arrive at my clinic there tends to be a lot of waiting around. I help the assistants clean, by mopping all of the floors, sanitizing the rooms and making sure everything else is in order for the day ahead. This takes on average of about 30 to 40 minutes every morning and after we are done cleaning there is quite a bit of sitting and talking. The dentist usually shows up around 10:30 and most of the time the first patient follows around 11 am.

Every afternoon from 1 to 3 pm we have a break at the clinic. This is the time when I head home to eat lunch with my host family and other students, as well as end my day of service learning. Lunch consists of a bowl of soup, usually followed by rice, some form of potato and chicken. (It’s a good thing I like all of these foods because we tend to eat them every day).

After lunch we usually find ourselves at a coffee shop working on the week’s assignments, or just exploring around our town. There are so many things that are within walking distance, it makes it very easy to get around the main street. If we are feeling adventurous or just want to go a little further, we can head to the plaza for the afternoon. There you can find all kinds of amazing foods, as well as shopping for anything that you could imagine. It is only a taxi ride away and you can usually get them for about 5 or 6 soles, which is very inexpensive.

After this, we eat dinner with our host family around 7 pm. Usually at the dinner table with us is our father, mother, their son, and their niece that has been living with us for the past few weeks. It is a fun time to sit and talk about our days and communicate as best we can with them. They don’t speak any English, but they are very good about talking slowly and trying to explain things if we do not understand them the first time. This is definitely one of my favorite parts of the day. It is sometimes challenging to communicate and understand, but it is a time for learning and growing. I truly do enjoy these moments and I look forward to many more.


Mollie Maupin is a sophomore at the University of Missouri- Kansas City studying Chemistry and Psychology. She will spend four weeks in Peru with the ISA Service Learning: Cusco program. While in Cusco she will shadow in a dental clinic, learning from numerous professionals.

 Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Struggles in Argentina

My first week of Argentina has been full of emotion. Struggling to get to the places that I wanted to go and getting lost on the way. New experiences and meeting new people. A lot of things has happened so far on this trip. Not everything will go the way you want it to and you just have to keep moving forward. During my first week in Argentina, there was a lot of miscommunication. There were many things that I could not understand and words that I didn’t know how to say. It led me to the case of a problem with my host family and eventually moving to a new one. Not everyone will have the perfect host family. It is up to you to decide whether you stay or change families. I learned that it’s not good to have an uncomfortable environment especially in a foreign country and it’s going to affect your studying abroad experience in a negative way. Moving to a new host family changed me. I felt more comfortable coming home after a long day of exploring. Staying at a host family is the foundation of our experience while studying abroad. If your foundation is strong, you feel more confident and comfortable to adjust to the new country.

Struggling to translate everything in your mind to Spanish was rough. There were times that I was very frustrated with Spanish. As the days passed, I got used to hearing Spanish around me. I definitely feel that I’m improving and being more comfortable speaking in Spanish. There were times that I got lost in Argentina and I had to ask for directions. Many of the citizens in Argentina are very nice and willing to help. Luckily, I was able to find two girls who were about my age to help me get home. They were getting on the same bus as I was and I was able to make two new friends that day.

Even though I struggled to get to places and had some miscommunication, this didn’t stop me to keep moving forward. I think it actually taught me a lesson that my study abroad experience will not be perfect. I had too much high expectation for this trip and I think what I really needed was to relax and let everything happen as it goes. Till next time…. On with the journey!


Julie Jeong is currently a freshman at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Chemistry, Entrepreneurship, and Spanish. Julie will spend the summer with the UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She plans to attend UMKC’s Dental School after her undergraduate study. She plans to use Spanish in her career as a future dentist who strives to help patients and eliminate miscommunications.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

Rainbow Mountain

When traveling to Peru, everyone’s first thought is visiting Machu Picchu. Of course this is a site that can’t be missed, but growing quickly in popularity is Rainbow mountain which has very recently been discovered (or as the locals call it: la montaña de siete colores). It is in fact as the name implies a very large mountain and the colors vibrantly represent that of a rainbow. It was everything I thought it would be, and its vast beauty is one that I wish everyone would get to experience first-hand. I will admit that it is quite the hike getting to the top, but it is absolutely worth it in the end.

We booked our day trip through a tour company that picked us up at 5:15 am right in front of our hotel. We did our research and found that most tours tend to leave around 3:30 in order to be some of the first travelers atop the mountain, but our tour guide seemed to have a better plan (and frankly two more hours of sleep was much appreciated). We left Cusco and traveled two hours by bus until we came upon a small town, where we stopped to eat breakfast. After breakfast we got back on the bus and traveled one more hour to the base of rainbow mountain.

Stepping out of the bus we were met with a cold blast of air and wind all around us. Our guide informed us that as we hiked up the mountain in the sun we would be sweating and shedding layers, but at the top it would be very cold and we would need all of our cold weather items. (He was right). As we began the 5.5 kilometer hike, I quickly shed layers and found myself so out of breath. Side note: I’ve played sports for my entire life, including college soccer up until last fall. With this in mind, I thought I would be perfectly fine climbing the mountain that lie ahead of me. Yeah, I was very wrong about that. Two of my friends and I would walk about a total of 20 yards and have to stop to catch our breaths…at kilometer 3 we decided that we just couldn’t do it anymore. Fortunately, there are many locals that go up and down the mountain with their horses all day long just waiting for people like myself. I had every intention to make it to the top without any help, but the altitude got me. It really did.

When we finally reached our destination and stood atop this beautiful place, it was an amazing feeling. Not only taking in the beauty of the landscape, but looking around and seeing the number of travelers from all around the world. Speaking dozens of different languages, all there to witness the same thing. It’s an experience that I will never forget and an opportunity that I hope many others will get to endure as well.


Mollie Maupin is a sophomore at the University of Missouri- Kansas City studying Chemistry and Psychology. She will spend four weeks in Peru with the ISA Service Learning: Cusco program. While in Cusco she will shadow in a dental clinic, learning from numerous professionals.

 Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Study Abroad Fail 1/?

In preparing for my trip, I have been told time and time again that study abroad is about failing, about getting lost and finding the way back, about enjoying when things don’t go as planned. I figured these character-building failures would not begin until I was actually in-country, or at least the airport. As it turns out, I experienced my first #studyabroadfail while still at home in U.S.

The Plan: drive home from Kansas City to Illinois on Wednesday evening, spend time with my family, fly out on Friday afternoon

The Hitch: at 9:57 Thursday morning, I realized I had left my passport in my Kansas City apartment

I have always been a relentlessly organized, obsessively over-prepared person. I had packed my bags a week in advance, crossed everything off my to-do lists in my pristine bullet journal, and was excited to spend two days relaxing at home with my family before taking off. It took a full 30 seconds for me to accept that I had actually committed the monumental mistake of forgetting my most important travel document in a shoe box 287 miles away.

My mother and I promptly abandoned our plans for the day in favor of a 9-hour round-trip drive to Kansas City. She was remarkably unflustered about it, reminding me in her typical motherly fashion that “at least we remembered today instead of tomorrow, two hours before your flight.” This reminder helped to decrease the frequency of my self-deprecating exclamations that inevitably punctuated our drive. (She did, however, immediately regret her comment during breakfast about hoping to go on a road trip soon.)

Our impromptu road trip actually provided an excellent opportunity for us to spend time together before my departure. The long, tedious, uneventful drive across the entire state of Missouri gave us plenty of time to catch up, argue about politics, and jam out to the Hamilton soundtrack. Though I think we both would have preferred hanging around the house in our pajamas and grabbing lunch and coffee at my favorite hometown spots, the drive was comfortingly reminiscent of the hours we used to spend in our beloved Mighty Prius when she drove me to lessons, rehearsals, and summer camps while I snoozed or did homework in the passenger seat.

In the end, this seemingly huge mistake actually worked out okay; I retrieved my passport with plenty of time to spare and got to spend some quality time with my mom. This pre-departure mistake showed me that it is okay to fail, that mistakes can be fixed, and that it is possible to enjoy the journey that these failures bring. I’m definitely ready to relish in all the mistakes and failures that my time abroad will inevitably include.


Amber Litteken is a freshman at the University of Missouri-Kansas City majoring in Instrumental Music Education and minoring in Spanish Language and Literature. Amber will spend six weeks of the summer abroad with the UMKC Faculty-Led Spanish Language Summer in Buenos Aires, Argentina as a Gilman Scholar. Amber is from Breese, Illinois and plays bassoon.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

Reflection Before Departure

Last January I visited my family in south Texas, we had a chance to visit the local flea market, or more familiarly, la pulga. Here, one can find imported medicine from Mexico, children’s clothing. handmade jewelry, bootleg DVDs, and even exotic birds. La pulga always has a mixed bag of goods. It goes without mentioning that the food there is plentiful. Whether it’s a menudo kind of day, or the temptation for a fried spiral potato drenched in lime and chile is stronger, (okay, both) la pulga is the spot to be humble and buy some cheap stuff.

While the winter sun beamed on my neck, my sister, Jennifer, took her time looking at jewelry at one of the vendor tables. Personally, I have never been interested in jewelry beyond the studs on my ears. But as I let my gaze move along the necklaces, I wondered if I could get something with La Virgen de Guadalupe. Eyeing a black threaded necklace, Jennifer asked the woman behind the table, “¿Pueda cambiar el talismán de esta collar?” The woman handed us a bag full of charms representing various figures in Catholicism. After picking through the many crosses and portraits of Jesus, I found La Virgen. With a red threaded necklace in hand and La Virgen in the other, I asked the woman, “¿…y esta tambien?” My sister paid her and I put mine on immediately.

Beyond the religious sentiment La Virgen represents, I see her as a connection to my family and culture. To me, she represents feminine strength. Most of my life has been around women, and I have learned to embrace my own femininity. Being without family near for so long, I find myself slipping away, disengaged with that part of my life. She serves as reminder of who I am, and where I came from, keeping me grounded. And, sometimes, I feel like she protects me.  So, I keep her with me everyday since that afternoon at la pulga. 

Identity is something I have been actively exploring as an adult. As I become more self-aware and mindful, more and more facets of my identity are unraveled and revealed. Growing up white and gay in a predominately Catholic, Mexican-American community, I found it difficult to claim my own latinx identity. While Spanish was heard all around me, be it at school or the homes of my family, I did not engage in anything other than English. Sure, I had an ear for Spanish, but I carried so much embarrassment for not confidently owning my Spanish tongue. My family would always tease me as a child. “Mijito doesn’t like speaking Spanish, I don’t know why.” It would infuriate me even more as a teenager. By then, I had moved states away to Kansas City, a clean slate. As I got older, I realized I can still manage to stay connected to my past. Throughout high school, university, and the numerous service jobs I had, Spanish became a medium for exploration of my own linguistic identity.

Like La Virgen, Spanish has become another way to keep me connected to my roots.

So, what does any of this have to do with studying abroad in Argentina? Well, as I frantically get all of my objectives checked off before leaving the country for six weeks (hughhhhh), say my see-you -laters to my friends and coworkers, and prepare to be broke upon arrival back home (hhhnnuughhh), I am ready to explore my Spanish-speaking self. Away from the reality of work-sleep-work-sleep-work-sleep, I feel at ease. Through Argentina and her culture, I am ready to learn, make connections, and take in everything she has to offer.

Until then –


Robert Grigsby is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Spanish and Film Production. Robert will spend the summer term abroad at the Universidad de Belgrano with UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Preparing for a New Journey

I will be traveling to Buenos Aires, Argentina this summer to study abroad. I am very excited to travel abroad for the first time and to travel alone without my family. This is a good opportunity for me to improve in my spanish and travel to a different country. I have packed all my clothes and things that I may need for Argentina. When I arrive, it will be winter time and I’ll deeply miss the warm weather that Kansas brings. Due to the weather, I have packed warm winter clothes but also some summer clothes because I could travel to another country that may be warm with other students. I also have packed my host family’s gift as well. It’s nice to give a small gift to the host family to thank them for having me stay at their home.

Before I leave for Argentina, I will need to finish my homework that my professor has assigned my class. My professor has assigned us homework to do before we leave so that we can get most of the homework done and spend most of our time with activities to do in Argentina. I think this is a good way for all the students to explore more in Argentina rather than be stuck at home doing homework. I’m nervous for my classes in Argentina. Hopefully I can adjust well to the environment and get along with everyone. I’ve said my goodbyes to my friends and family because I will miss them while I am in Argentina. I can feel the butterflies in my stomach going crazy for this trip. I will be leaving soon and I am excited for this new journey. Argentina here I come!


Julie Jeong is currently a freshman at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Chemistry, Entrepreneurship, and Spanish. Julie will spend the summer with the UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She plans to attend UMKC’s Dental School after her undergraduate study. She plans to use Spanish in her career as a future dentist who strives to help patients and eliminate miscommunications.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

 

Packed: You Sure You Didn’t Leave Anything Behind?

My room is a mess. My clothes are sprawled out across every surface, luggage laying open and half full on the floor, and I’m pretty sure my toothbrush is laying on my nightstand… wait, did I pack my toothbrush already? Yeah, I should probably get that back out; I’m not leaving for four more days, and brushing my teeth this week is definitely in my best interest.

Am I going crazy? Maybe. I can tell you one thing for certain: I don’t want to leave anything behind. I’ve made checklists on top of checklists to make sure I don’t forget anything, but I can still guarantee you I am going to leave a few things behind; not necessarily because I forget them but because I’m leaving. In a few days, I am leaving my home, and I’m not coming back… for six weeks. Wow. That just hit me like a ton of bricks.

I’m going to be gone for 42 days, and I’m leaving a lot behind: my family, my friends, and life as I know it. I wish I could shove them all into my suitcase and take them with me, but I just can’t. It’s going to be really hard leaving all the comforts of home behind, but that’s what adventure is all about right? Getting out of your comfort zone?

I didn’t sign up to go to Argentina because I wanted to experience the same things I do back home. I’m traveling halfway across the world! I want to be a part of something completely new. I want to see the vibrant landscapes, smell the crisp ocean breeze, taste the exquisite food, hear the hustle and bustle of the city, and feel beneath my feet ground I have not yet tread on.

Studying abroad is all about getting out there and being a part of something new. It’s not about what you’re bringing with you, or even what you left behind (No, forgetting that extra pair of socks is not going to make or break your study abroad experience). Studying abroad is a time to embrace uncertainty and seek out the unknown.

So, go on and forget, I tell myself! Whatever it is, you don’t need it where you’re going. Ditch that checklist and zip up your suitcase because it’s time to go. Tell your family you love them and your friends goodbye; It’s time to see the world.

(Below: pictures of me saying goodbye to my family)


Sam Nelson is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City majoring in Psychology and Economics with a minor in Spanish. Sam will study abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Buenos Aires, Argentina during Summer of 2018 with hopes of improving his Spanish language skills. He is a member of Pride Alliance and several other student organizations. After Sam completes his degree at UMKC, he plans to attend graduate school and earn his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Swinging en el Sur

My stomach dropped as I felt myself settle into the wooden tree swing, gliding out over the Andes Mountains outside of Baños, Ecuador. “Wow, I wonder how much more I could see if the earth were flat,” I thought to myself as the crisp wind whistled past my ears.

For the past four weeks I have been a mochilero, a backpacker, making my way through Colombia and Ecuador with my friend, wearing and rewearing the same sets of clothes and hiking shoes and learning about travel and native culture in each town and city we visit.

In Colombia, we began on the busy streets of Bogotá, touring the city and hiking Monserrate before taking an overnight bus to Medellín. From Medellín to the small coffee town of Salento, we hiked national parks in the Andes Mountains with elevations so high we oftentimes looked down on the clouds. From Salento to Cali, we experienced the national atmosphere during the tense, stalemate election before crossing the border into Ecuador. Through Quito to Baños, we hiked around one of the country’s active volcanos and the deafening waterfall deemed Pailon del Diablo (Devil’s Caldron). From the authentic, laid-back native culture of Cuenca, to the fast-paced, modern culture of Guayaquil, we traveled north along Ecuador’s small beach towns, hiking, whale watching, and snorkeling as we went. Now, as we finish this eye-opening experience zip-lining in the quiet, pueblito of Mindo, I am excited for my new experiences in Buenos Aires and Argentina.

Almost every day over the past two weeks, I have found myself thinking of and anticipating Buenos Aires; receiving feelings similar to those I had on that swing in Baños. As I anxiously search the internet for flight advice for solo international travelers, I feel that same uneasiness in taking that first step to fly out over the Andes. Though the change in pace will be different, I look forward to Buenos Aires. I am excited to set feet on stationary ground, establishing a relationship with my host family and classmates, while becoming more comfortable with the people, culture, language, diet, and transportation.

Through stressful, unplanned circumstances abroad, I have tested my capabilities, learning the most applicable knowledge in the past four weeks than I have ever learned before. I am excited to push myself in Buenos Aires, continuing to jump out over the edge of the mountains and swing into my next journey in Argentina.


Felix Amparano is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Chemistry, Spanish, and Biology. Felix is excited to spend six-weeks of his summer studying Spanish in Buenos Aires, Argentina with the UMKC Spanish Program. During his time abroad, Felix hopes to gain a better understanding of Argentine culture and health care with the hopes of becoming more culturally competent in his approaches to patient treatment.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.