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The mighty and powerful…. Ocean!

I am a little ol’ farm girl as I have said before. I had never been anywhere before this trip and that includes the ocean unfortunately. But I finally got to see the Ocean last week!!! Let me tell you I have never seen anything more beautiful and powerful.

The beautiful ocean!

I was immediately captivated and in love with the ocean. It was cold out and the water was dark, but I was still in love and I have made myself a promise to save all of my money and go to a warmer beach next summer! My classmates and I walked around the beach collecting rocks, shells, and memories. We laughed as many of us had to climb or rocks to get close to the ocean and quite a few of us fell a few times (I may or may not be the person who fell repeatedly, but we won’t talk about that). One of my classmates found a dead jellyfish on the beach that must have gotten stuck when the tide rose up and couldn’t escape when the tide went back down.

The poor jellyfish we found.

We were also had the most perfect view of a castle ruin in the background of our ocean adventure and what made the ocean experience even more fun was the people I was experiencing it with. My classmates are so supportive and sweet. They make every adventure fun and worth it.

The castle ruins.

I am very grateful I get to experience some of these amazing “firsts” of my life with them. A few of us sat on a rock for a while and just enjoyed the amazing view of the ocean in front of us. The air was a little crisp, but we didn’t care. We watched the amazing power of ocean waves crashing into the rocks and felt how truly small we are and how beautiful the world is. If you are in need of a humbling experience go to the ocean and just stare at how large it is. It makes you feels so small and your troubles even smaller. I hope all of you get to see the ocean someday and get to adventure the world with some amazing people like I do. Good luck and may adventure find you… and may it help you find yourself.


Kylie Wilson is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. She is spending the summer term abroad with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland. Kylie is from small town Helena, Missouri and hopes to be a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit nurse in the future. She has a pet cow named Betsy whom she loves dearly.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

“Do You Fancy a Cuppa?”

Some of the most pleasant surprises can be found in the strangest places. In this case, a couple friends and I discovered Forsyth’s Tea Room hidden in a narrow alleyway between The Wee Gift Shop and a pharmacy on The Royal Mile, a road with Edinburgh Castle on one end and Holyrood Palace on the other. I would have walked right past it if I had not earlier read a review online mentioning the alley. When we entered the small teashop, the charming owner, an older woman in an apron behind the counter, warmly greeted us and the gracious host showed us to a table. The intricate carpet, patterned tablecloths, teacup-lined walls, and beautiful decorations made the narrow room of brick and stone walls exceptionally cozy.

 

Charming decorations at Forsyth’s Tea Room

Deciding against the full all-day breakfasts and “Traditional Afternoon Tea,” which included both a sandwich and a large sultana scone served with butter, preserves, and whipped cream, I made my way to the counter to choose a lighter option. I learned later that afternoon tea was originally a mini meal meant to hold busy workers over before dinner was served at 8:00 PM, explaining why such hardy options made an appearance on the menu. With my mouth watering, I stood staring at the counter filled with every kind of sweet and light dish you could imagine—Dutch apple pie, carrot cake, lemon meringue pie, key lime pie, chocolate fudge cake, coffee walnut cake, toffee pecan pie, fruit cake, apricot pie, Scottish shortbread, cheese pasties, and traditional Scotch meat pies (just to name a few)—and tried to decide which one to have as a compliment to my tea.

After considering each of these bountiful options, I eventually decided to order the classic “Scottish Oaties,” a sweet biscuit (or “cookie” as we would refer to it in the U.S.) similar to the oatcakes (recipe here) available at almost every restaurant serving traditional Scottish dishes. Almost immediately after we returned to our table, the courteous host brought our pastries on a delicate platter with a teapot painted to look like a house with children peeking in the window. With the tea and desserts warming us from the chilly, damp weather outside, we had a very pleasant couple of hours just visiting around the table, slowly sipping from our exquisitely painted teacups.

Although the website reported that the teashop was casual, I felt just a bit underdressed in my capris and tennis shoes, however, the comforting atmosphere created by the lovely staff quickly made me forget my embarrassment. It also allowed us, as unfamiliar customers, to thoroughly enjoy our first experience participating in a traditional British afternoon tea. I like to drink tea every so often while at home, but this was the first time I had it served with milk alongside the sugar, and my first cup since I’ve been in one of the largest tea-drinking countries in the world! One of my friends, who much prefers coffee, was also able to enjoy a couple cups and the new experience. The combination of friendly service, delicious food, delightful decorations, and, most importantly, hot, strong tea made our first teatime especially memorable and an experience I just may have to repeat at least once while I’m here.

 


Kathryn Smith is a freshman at the University of Missouri- Kansas City majoring in Psychology and Pre-Medicine, with the goal to become a psychiatrist. During the month of July, Kathryn is participating in the UMKC Honors College Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Eat, Pray, Love

Three weeks. In this short amount of time, I have managed to independently fly over international waters and safely land in Scotland. This has been a drastic change from previously living at home with my parents. There has been many adjustments I have had to make, and one of them includes food. I have always been a food lover, but this trip has expanded my pallet.

Vegetarian chili at Paradise Palms in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Scotland is very unique in regards to food. Despite the oddities of generic types of produce into a word pun, I have enjoyed every new experience. Similar to the United States, Scotland does cater to different food options, yet this country goes above and beyond. Scottish dishes use farm fresh foods produced in the country and accommodates to everyone’s eating preference.

Soup and sandwich at Folk Cafe in Dundee, Scotland.

I have to admit that I was a bit apprehensive about what would be served, since I have been a vegetarian for nine years, yet I am the opposite of starved. It feels as if I have ate my weight in food, especially the pastries and desserts. I only wish that when I return back to the States, that it would be more accommodating to my food needs.

Crape at Wanderlust Cafe and Bistro in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Eating around the world has given me a brief glimpse of Scottish culture. Food is universal and connects others together regardless of their background.


Kayli Warner is a senior honors student at the University of Missouri-Kansas City majoring in Theatre and specializing in Costume Design. She is spending the 2017 summer term abroad with the faculty-led UMKC Honors Summer Program in Scotland. Kayli is a member of the Omicron Delta Kappa Society.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Scotland Shockers

It’s been almost a month since I last had a burrito. One week before coming to Scotland I had to get my wisdom teeth out, so eating Spanish food was way out of the question for me. It seems as if it’s going to stay that way for another two weeks. There is one promising restaurant, but I have a feeling a place called “Burrito and Shake” is not going to be the same as Freebirds or Chipotle. Beyond my craving for a burrito, I have experienced various other “culture shocks” while in Scotland.

When I first arrived at my Air BnB at the beginning of the month my initial thought was you’ve got to be kidding me. Scotland was not designed for tall people. I am about six feet tall and I have to duck my head the majority of times I go to historical sites. There is also a problem with how low the sinks are in proportion to me. My other biggest culture shock has been going into the grocery store only to find out they don’t keep eggs in the fridge. I don’t trust like that. However, I did end up braving the fridge-less eggs and so far I have not gotten sick.

Other things to look out for when coming to Scotland is to know which way to look when crossing the street and definitely know how to recycle. As for looking the right way, traffic here goes the opposite way than in the United States. I still get a mini heart attack when I see a car moving and there isn’t anyone sitting on the left hand side. It also feels very uncomfortable when the bus turns right and has to go through traffic like a left turn in the United States. As for the recycling, I discovered a small gray tub with a lid in my kitchen when I got to my flat at the University. Luckily, my roommate knew exactly what it was for. Instead of throwing away food, Scotland composts it. Does it smell awful? Yes. Is it worth it? Environmentalists say yes, but I don’t think this one habit that will follow me back to the United States.


Samantha Bradfield is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Psychology and Art History.  Samantha is spending the summer abroad with the UMKC Honors Summer Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Top Ten Things Scotland Does that America Should Start Doing

Being a country for two and a half weeks makes you realize some of the things that your home country is missing. Aside from the beautiful rolling hills and castles with hundreds of years of history, here are ten things feasible that America should start doing that Scotland already does.

  1. Traffic lights should change to yellow right before they’re green. In the US, they only change to warn you the light is turning red, but here they change to let you know that the light is about to turn green again.
  2. Bring back the dollar coin. Great Britain uses the pound coin and it’s been great. I never thought I’d say that it’s easier to use this than the a bill, but it really is.
  3. Get rid of tipping. The price isn’t any different from the US and we only have to tip 10%. Yes, the service is a little different, but there aren’t any people hovering over you, so that’s a plus!
  4. Fix the public transportation system. It’s great to be able to hop on the bus to head to another city or grab a train. They also have a great tram system, similar to our KC streetcar, but much more developed.
  5. More student discounts! Maybe it’s because the University of Edinburgh is spread out all over the city, but tons of restaurants and even department stores give a 10-20% discount for student purchases!
  6. Stop being coffee snobs. Coffee over here is centered around the espresso maker, not drip coffee. Less room for error here, plus you don’t have to worry about your coffee having “floral hints” or “brown sugar notes” if you’re not interested.
  7. Encourage walking. I have loved walking everywhere, even though the weather doesn’t always cooperate. People are in much better shape here too, probably because it takes a good 10-15 minutes to get to the buzz of the city.
  8. Include tax in the price. Do you know how easy it is not to have to calculate the price of tax into your purchase? Shopping is a lot easier when there’s not as much math involved.
  9. Promote self-checkouts at neighborhood markets. Yes, they exist at Wal-Mart, but they are extremely inconvenient to use. The UK has got the system down.
  10. Have more live music. Do you know what it’s like to have bagpipes almost constantly playing? It’s like we have our own personal Scottish soundtrack everywhere we go. (Okay, that last one really isn’t feasible, but it’s still cool.)

Maybe we should implement these changes, maybe we shouldn’t. It’s still an interesting study to see the cultural differences between the two countries-both positive and negative.


Emily McIntyre is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Marketing and Entrepreneurship with a Spanish minor. Emily is involved with several student organizations, including UMKC Enactus, which uses entrepreneurship to solve needs in the community. She’s looking forward to studying abroad this summer with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland, where she plans to explore more of her family heritage and country of origin.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

A Guide to Scottish Food

The best breakfast I have ever had.

Hearty. That is the best word I can come up with to describe Scottish cuisine. I love the food here so much. I would stay in Scotland forever just for the food. The breads are all fresh. The fruits are all sweet and the deserts are out of this world. Don’t even get me started on how good their jams are. I am not a fan of their meats, but I don’t really like to eat meat back in the United States either. I am going to give you a guide today on what you MUST try if you are ever in Scotland and some great foods to try if you are a vegetarian! First, eat the scones. They are phenomenal. I have had a scone everyday for the past week because the are so good. You can put butter on it or eat it plain. But I think they are best with the raspberry jam here. The raspberry Jam is so good I could just eat that without the scone! Next, you must eat some pie while you are in Scotland. The fruits here are so good and fresh in the summer months, so a fresh slice of pie with a cup of coffee is a great way to spend an afternoon in Scotland.

My lovely pie and coffee.

It is a bit colder here in Scotland even in the summer months, so a nice cup of steaming hot coffee is nice on crisp breezy mornings. Make sure you find yourself in one of the many coffee shops around Scotland to enjoy a nice cup of coffee and the view of scenery around you. Another must have is Scottish shortbread cookies.

My half eaten Scottish Shortbread cookie! It was too good to wait to take a picture!

They are delicious with some of that raspberry jam I keep going on and on about or you can have them by themselves they are still just as great! The cheese here for sandwiches or Mac’ and cheese is amazing as well. It is very rich and worth a try. The vegetarian Lasagna here was not my forte, but my friends who are vegetarian loved it and the Risotto as well. Scottish scrambled eggs are also a must try. I ate all of my eggs up and I am going to have eggs again (and again, and again) before I leave Scotland! But to warn you, they do not refrigerate their eggs here… I went to the grocery store and the eggs are just sitting in a random food isle. I tried them though and they were still very tasty and I am still alive, so I promise you it will be okay!  Another Scottish staple that you must have is of course the famous Haggis. If you do not know what Haggis let me explain. It is diced up and seasoned sheep INSIDE of a sheep’s stomach. Now here me out, it is their national dish and it isn’t as bad as it sounds. Also if you are a vegetarian there is vegetarian haggis that you can try that is pretty tasty as well. These are just some of my favorites since I have been here, but feel free to branch out and try something new and different. You never know a new dish may become one of your favorites, or if not you may get a funny story out of it. Good luck and may cuisine adventure find you.


Kylie Wilson is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. She is spending the summer term abroad with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland. Kylie is from small town Helena, Missouri and hopes to be a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit nurse in the future. She has a pet cow named Betsy whom she loves dearly.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

The Wheels on the Bus go ‘Round and ‘Round (and so does my stomach)

Most people get home sick when they study abroad, I, however, managed to get extremely bus sick.

It was the end of the first week of classes and my professors planned a bus trip out to the Scottish borders to see Sir Walter Scott’s House,

I also took this on the bus ride to the Scottish Borders. I was captivated by the arches and grace of the bridge.

Kelso Abbey and Jedburgh Abbey. I was excited to get out of the city for a day and see what the countryside had to offer. Bright and early Friday morning, I hopped on the bus and grabbed a window seat ready to start this adventure. The tour guide, named Doogie, was hilarious and set the mood for an exciting and fun day. I was giddy in my seat and could hardly sit still. My eyes never drifted from the window for fear I would miss something. Scotland really does have a vast landscape of rolling green hills, sheep and cows wandering about and a scattering of tall trees scattered about.

I took this picture of the country side on the bus ride to the Scottish Borders. This was the typical scene in this part of Scotland.

I felt great until the trees started to sway and then I realized I was doing the swaying. I wanted to close my eyes and get my bearings but the desired to see everything won out and I was compelled to look out the window again. The bus took a sharp turn and we started going down a squiggly road. My stomach didn’t feel very attached to the rest of me at this point. Yet, silly and stubborn me still wanted to look out the window. I told myself, you’re only in Scotland once, you have to see everything. You can close your eyes tonight when you go to bed.

On the way to the last stop of the day, the Jedburgh Abbey, the thick air was warm and suffocating. Pressing against me each time a tried to draw in a long, deep breath. My head felt like it was spinning and may just pop off at any moment. My body numb to the vibration of the bus underneath me. My stomach recoiling, not happy that it was being disrupted. I tried to take in another deep breath. I would not throw up. I would not throw up. I was determined to keep it together because throwing up on a bus is one of those things that will follow you for the rest

The Jedburgh Abbey is the most intact Abbey left standing. Even in ruins, this building is still beautiful and magnificent.

of your life. Suddenly, the bus lurched to a stop. I was at my destination, the Jedburgh Abbey. Just in time. Every so slowly I stood up and grabbed the seat next to me for support. I walked off the bus like a toddler who had just taken his first steps. Ah, solid ground. Clean, crisp fresh air!

I thought I would feel better after this but I was wrong. I was still swaying and my stomach was trying to creep its way out of my body. I felt so sick. I forced myself to see everything at each stop but by the end, I was dragging. My classmates and professors noticed I wasn’t looking too good. I tried to play it off like it wasn’t a big deal as I didn’t want to make it a big deal. However, you can only try and downplay bus sickness so much when you’re pale as a ghost and look like you might pass out at any moment.

As a typical American, I had to take a selfie. This was in front of the Jedburgh Abbey. Try not to look too closely, I’m looking a little rough around the edges.

I was told to sit down and drink some water. My fellow classmates concerned but still trying to keep their distance in case my stomach decided to show itself. Some motion sickness medicine was found for me before I got back on the bus and I got the honor of sitting next to Doogie on the ride back. He seemed a bit skeptical at first for fear he would get thrown up on. However, the ride back was much better and I managed to keep it together. I didn’t try and see all the scenery this time around, which probably helped. I managed to make it back in one piece and spent the rest of the night regaining the last of my bearings.

The lesson of this trip is to always remember to take motion sickness medicine before getting on a bus. Lucky for me, I now have sixteen people who are going to help remind me to take them. Not to mention, the seat at the very front of the bus has now been designated to me. It is one of those things that I will never live down. I have already been reminded to take motion sickness medicine before the next bus trip, which is a few days away I might add. If my stomach contents do make an appearance on this next trip I promise there will be no pictures.

Good luck and I hope adventure finds you with no motion sickness.

-Nicole Wilhelm


Nicole Wilhelm is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. Nicole is spending the month of July in many different cities in Scotland with the UMKC Honors College Program in Scotland. Nicole is involved in UMKC’s Campus Ambassadors, Swim and Dive Club, BHS Society, and Student Nursing Association.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

 

Eating Around the World while Already Halfway Around the World

As I prepared to travel to and live in the UK, I never imagined I would participate in French, Indian, Mediterranean, and Italian culture by eating their cuisine. Although I have enjoyed traditional Scottish foods like bangers and mash, fish and chips, shortbread, and tablet, I have also been introduced to foods like tandoori chicken, baklava, and paninis. I have walked by countless stores, markets, and restaurants celebrating the many cultures residents share with each other. Restaurants I have seen include at least twelve different cultural cuisines: Italian, Indian, German, Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Irish, French, Greek, Thai, Nepalese, and Middle Eastern. In this way, Edinburgh reminds me of Kansas City in its great diversity.

My first meal in the UK was at a restaurant named Café Jacques. Even though the name is French, the menu includes food from all over the world. Along with traditional British fare, like a full English breakfast, fish and chips, scones, and haggis, I could have chosen from French, American, Greek, Italian, and even Mediterranean dishes. I ended up selecting a traditional “jacket potato,” which is what we call a baked potato in the States, but I appreciated having so many options to make everyone feel like they’re at home.

Different Types of Baklava from Sweety House

After finishing a fresh French baguette from an outdoor market in the famous Grassmarket of Old Town Edinburgh, my next unexpected culinary adventure took place as my fellow students and our professors shared dishes at a potluck dinner last Friday. One flat brought tandoori chicken from the nearby Mosque Kitchen which everyone enjoyed, including myself, who hasn’t tried much Indian food. I learned recently that the panini I had for lunch that day at The Hoot ‘n’ Cat Coffee shop in Kelso during our field trip to the abbey ruins also originated in another country: Italy. This sandwich didn’t feel quite so different from meals I’ve had at home, but it was still my first time eating an actual Italian panini.

Finally, after hours of working on my research essay on Wednesday, I decided that I needed a break. So, one of my flatmates suggested that we stop into Sweety House, a Mediterranean pastry shop. Although I couldn’t pronounce any of the names and had never seen these kinds of pastries before, they all smelled and looked divine. We decided to split a sample plate of all different types of baklava, including some that looked like little bird nests, and packed it up to bring home. Once we sat around the small table in our kitchen and started trying pieces, the short homework break that was meant to last twenty minutes turned into two hours as we talked and got to know each other even better, bonding over a shared new experience.

As I reflect on how many new foods I have tried in only my first two weeks abroad, I think it says a lot about Edinburgh in how many traditions are represented and accepted in the city. It may not seem like these global experiences tell much about Scottish culture, but they really have taught me a lot about Edinburgh because the way a city celebrates and includes other cultures is an important part of its own.


Kathryn Smith is a freshman at the University of Missouri- Kansas City majoring in Psychology and Pre-Medicine, with the goal to become a psychiatrist. During the month of July, Kathryn is participating in the UMKC Honors College Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Doogie’s Scotland

“If everyone is in Jedburgh is just parking where they like, I think we’ll do the same.” If you can read that sentence in a Scottish accent and picture a middle-aged man that’s driven tour buses for 18 years, you’ve pictured Doogie, the guide from Haggis Tours that took us to Abbotsford, Sir Walter Scott’s home, Kelso Abbey, and Jedburgh Abbey. He was quirky in his own way, and talked almost non-stop for our hour’s long journey. He was full of useful information (and some that was not as useful too). He provided fun stories, unique insights, and an all around good time for our group, which is a good thing, because we’ll be taking Haggis Tours for all of our adventures.

Excited to explore Abbotsford, Sir Walter Scott’s home!

First, we stopped by Abbotsford, the home of Sir Walter Scott, who some claim has invented what we now know as Scotland, using his picturesque novels. We saw his beautiful home, designed to look like a castle, with its expansive gardens and well-planned library. I thought it looked like the Beast’s library that he gifts to Belle. Scott was quite the antiquarian (collector), so there were odds and ends all throughout his home. I felt that I would enjoy living there, but I would have to redecorate.

Taking time to spell the roses at Abbotsford Garden.

It was back on the bus with Doogie. He told us that he used to play the fiddle, and mentioned that violins and fiddles are different. “You know, people who play the violin are posh. People who play the fiddle are more rough. The violin players went to private school and know Latin. They’ve been playing since the age of four, but fiddle players just wake up one day and decide to play the fiddle.” (He also knew the technical differences, in case this explanation isn’t good enough.)

Admiring Jedburgh Abbey

There was a festival going on in Jedburgh during the time we were there, but once we entered the abbey, it got a lot quieter. The architecture was beautiful, and had both Gothic and Romanesque parts. It was built in sections, as not all could be done at once, due to both structural issues and cost. The pictures don’t do it justice. Doogie provided great insight into our trip, which could have easily just been a drive through the lowlands, but instead was educational and entertaining. Remember to learn from the locals; you’ll not only have fun, but sometimes you learn more than you can from any castle or museum!

 

 

 

 


Emily McIntyre is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Marketing and Entrepreneurship with a Spanish minor. Emily is involved with several student organizations, including UMKC Enactus, which uses entrepreneurship to solve needs in the community. She’s looking forward to studying abroad this summer with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland, where she plans to explore more of her family heritage and country of origin.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Romanticizing Atmosphere

It’s been seven days and two instances of falling irrevocably in love with Scotland since I first arrived.

It’s the kind of love you didn’t know you had room for. The first time my heart brimmed with a yearning so strong it seemed to buckle under the magnitude was against the backdrop of a church and the bagpipes.

Thick rain clouds had scattered while the evening set in, opening the sky to the call of the bagpipes. The church bells chimed, almost answering the lament. Surrounded by towering masonry and the echoes of the past, I could not help but swell with the atmosphere around me.

 

I felt the tug of false nostalgia again when stepping into the Jedburgh Abbey. Founded in the 12th century, the Augustinian abbey captured my heart again. It was the same bone crushing feeling as looking up into space: there is more than just me.

 

Standing in the middle of the towering abbey I couldn’t help but imagine the people that had passed through these walls. I couldn’t help but imagine what this abbey had witnessed. There was an underlying sense of energy to the ruins, something begging to be remembered. Yet again I felt myself sink deeper in love with Scotland.

My affinity for ancient artifacts has always caused me a great deal of emotion. I’m easily swooned by the Nelson-Atkins, and I’m in a very serious committed relationship with every Egyptian gallery I’ve stepped into.

There is just something unmistakably magical about objects surviving thousands of years. Being with the object in its own context is beyond a powerful interaction for me. I look forward to encountering more overwhelming sites in the next few weeks!

 

 

 

 

 

 


Samantha Bradfield is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Psychology and Art History. Samantha is spending the summer abroad with the UMKC Honors Summer Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.