Unpaid Internship Opportunity: Environmental History Collection and Exhibit Development, Missouri Historical Society

Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis, MO (Summer 2018)

The Missouri Historical Society (MHS) is accepting applications from students  interested in an unpaid assistantship or internship within the exhibitions and research division. The intern will assist in research for MHS’s artifact collection and in the content development of exhibits.

The intern’s responsibilities may include:

  • Identifying library, photography archive, and document archive holdings related to specific collection artifacts, including source and finding aid citations in a comprehensive summary report
  • Researching maker/manufacturer, industry, materials, ownership, and/or usage information of specified artifacts, including source and finding aid citations in a comprehensive summary report
  • Providing researched characterizations of discrete aspects of regional resource exploitation or conservation
  • Measuring, describing, and entering artifact identification information into Mimsy, the collections database management system
  • Assisting with artifact photography, document scanning, and/or interview transcription

A minimum of 10 hours per week for 12 to 15 weeks is desired, with a flexible schedule between 9am and 5pm, Monday through Friday. The final schedule will be determined with the supervisor.

Preferred assistantship candidates will be graduate students; undergraduate students in good academic standing with a passion for and competency in the subject will be considered for internship. Appropriate fields of academic study include: environmental studies, archaeology, material culture studies, history, museum studies, archive management, or similar fields. The applicant should have good communication, computer, and research skills, and sensitivity to and care for delicate artifacts.

To apply for this position, please submit a résumé to Vicki Kaffenberger and Tamaki A. Harvey Stratman at vak@mohistory.org and tamaki@mohistory.org. Candidates will then be directed to complete a full application. If selected for an interview, candidates will be asked to supply two references.

For questions, please contact: Vicki Kaffenberger at vak@mohistory.org or Tamaki A. Harvey Stratman at tamaki@mohistory.org.

The Missouri Historical Society is a nonprofit organization that serves as the confluence of historical perspectives and contemporary issues to inspire and engage audiences.

Job Opening: Curator of Collections, Riley Co KS Historical Museum

This is a specialized, professional position which provides collections curatorial leadership, vision and planning, and oversees the museum collections management system.

Essential Functions:

  • Supervises selection, registration, documentation, exhibition, and storage of incoming and outgoing artifacts.
  • Oversees the management of the collection by maintaining appropriate records, supervising proper environmental control, directing and following professional standards and practices.
  • Develops policy and procedures for collections management as needed.
  • Conducts research and prepares reports as needed.
  • Recruits, trains, and supervises collections interns, volunteers, and staff.
  • Assists with interpretive plans, education programs, exhibits, and other projects of the Museum.
  • Interacts with donors or potential donors and assists the public as needed.

Qualifications

Education: Minimum qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in museum studies, American history, or in a relevant field. Master’s degree in museum studies or history preferred. Experience: Three or more years of experience in supervision of museum collections preferred. Knowledge of collections rules, practices, standards, and procedures necessary to professionally perform and manage a wide variety of interrelated and possibly non-standard procedural assignments and to resolve a wide range of problems using independent judgment.

Special Requirements

Knowledge of Riley County history, the history of the American West, and material culture preferred. Pre-employment drug screening and background check is required upon conditional offer of employment.

To Apply, visit http://www.rileycountyks.gov/321/Employment-Information. Application deadline is May 1st.

Summer Internship: Missouri Coordinated Campaign

The Missouri Coordinated Campaign is looking for summer interns and fellows to join the campaign. The campaign is looking for motivated, dedicated individuals who want to learn the inner workings of a major political campaign and the ins and outs of the grassroots program it takes to win an election.

With flexible hours, this program is available to all students regardless of schedule. This internship will teach you what goes in to creating a grassroots field program, how to conduct a cutting-edge persuasion direct voter contact program, and you will meet friends and make professional contacts that will last a lifetime.

The campaign is also offering a fellowship program for interns interested in taking their involvement to the next level. Fellows will take on even more responsibility and leadership roles, and will participate in specialized training programs on campaign data, reporting, and community engagement. The skills fellows will learn will equip them with all of the tools they need to find future employment in the fields of organizing, campaigns, and government. Greater time commitment is required.

The Missouri Coordinated Campaign internship and fellowship programs are designed to be a top-notch, informative, and educational experience – providing an entry-level launching point for future careers in politics and campaigns. Program participants will engage with voters in their communities, learn from and work directly with seasoned campaign staff, and hear from a number of guest speakers. In addition, participation in a program like this is an excellent addition to a college application, so rising Juniors and Seniors are encouraged to apply.

To apply for an internship or a fellowship with the Missouri Coordinated Campaign or to learn about general volunteer opportunities, apply online at https://missouridemocrats.org/intern/, call us at (314) 690-8108, or email us at intern@missouridems.org.

 

Education Intern & Summer Camp Manager Wornall/Majors House Museums

The Wornall/Majors House Museums is seeking one individual to assist with developing curriculum and educational programming for children for our summer camp series. This position is a hybrid position of an unpaid internship and paid camp management position. Building on the groundwork laid by previous camp sessions, the Curriculum Intern will work to create thematic lesson plans centering on various topic relevant to mid-nineteenth century history education, including, but not limited to: frontier life, the Civil War, Native American culture, horticulture, and arts and crafts. The intern will put their lesson plans into action as Summer Camp Manager for two weeks of camp programming.

Responsibilities:
• Develop Summer Camp curriculum, including but not limited to: scheduling presenters, developing new activities, refining or refreshing existing activities, and researching new curriculum strategies.
• Communicate with parents prior to camp start dates.
• Work with the Volunteer Manager to recruit and manage Junior Volunteers (ages 12+) prior to and during camp.
• Assist in creating and maintaining budget for program expenses.
• Serve as Summer Camp Manager through the summer of 2017, managing all day-to-day operations of the Museum’s camp program, which will consist of two weeks (10 days) of camp sessions.
• Inventory and organize camp supplies during and following camp sessions.
• Other administrative tasks as assigned.
Requirements
• Must be available June 11-15 and July 9-13 for all camp sessions.
• Good people skills, including comfort in speaking to a group and managing others.
• Good time management skills when creating and adhering to a schedule, with the ability to be flexible if needed.
• Must pass an NCSI background check.
• CPR/First Aid certified, or willing to obtain certification, paid for by Wornall/Majors.
• Experience with children preferred.
• Either majoring in or experience with education, history, or recreation management.

The position of Curriculum Intern begins in May and extends through July. This portion of the internship is unpaid. 5-15 hours per week.

During the time that the intern is serving as Summer Camp Manager (June 11-15, July 16-20, and any time directly related to set up/tear down logistics of camp), the intern will be paid $10/hr.
Intern will work primarily out of our Wornall House location during camp planning session (6115 Wornall Rd., KCMO), and at the Majors House location during the duration of summer camp (8201 State Line Rd., KCMO).

Apply: 
To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter to Sarah Bader-King at programs@wornallmajors.org.

The Wornall/Majors House Museums is a non-profit that preserves and protects two of Kansas City’s most significant antebellum landmarks – the John Wornall House Museum and the Alexander Majors House Museum. The Museums engage the Kansas City community by bringing history to life through innovative, hands-on programs and experiences. The houses, both listed on the National Register of Historic Places, feature hands-on tours, field trips, summer camps, adult education programs, and more.

Our interns will experience many facets of museum management, educational programming, and nonprofit administration. We value our interns and go the extra mile to make sure you receive a learning experience that fits your career goals. Internships can be tailored to fit requirements for college credit.

Preparing Object Records for Accession

I’ve finished compiling all the gathered information about the objects in the Alexander Major’s House into an Excel spreadsheet, which I believe will then be imported into PastPerfect (the museum’s collections management software). There are several required fields that must be filled out when adding object records for accession.

One is the Collection field. I decided to have each room of the house be its own collection. For example, there’s a painting of Alexander Majors in the house’s entry hall, so it will be part of the Entry Hall Collection. Objects are given both a less descriptive Object Name, as well as a more descriptive Object Title. The Object Title would be “Oil Painting of Alexander Majors,” while the Object Name would simply be “Painting.” The Object Description includes even more details about an object, including information about the object’s specific location in the room, it’s composition, place of origin, etc. For instance, the Object Description for the Major’s painting contains details about the artist and painting, like how it was painted by local artist Mary Campbell and was based on a tintype of Majors at age thirty-six. Other information required in an object record include the date the object was made, the name of the donor, the catalog date, and the name of the staff member who cataloged the object. The most difficult part has been finding out who the donor of an object was, which I am currently working on by looking through old newsletters and organizational papers.

Unpaid Internship Opportunity: Congressional Leadership Fund

The Congressional Leadership Fund is currently seeking students interested in learning more about campaigning and effective public communications. Student interns will gain invaluable knowledge about the democratic process and work to become adept communicators through hands on experience with elected officials, candidates, and the general public. The internship opportunities for this Fall are open to any student; however, they must apply and be accepted. Hours are flexible, but students must be able to commit to 8-10 hours per week and are responsible for their own transportation.

The 2018 election cycle promises to be one of the most contested elections in history.  The

Congressional Leadership Fund will be an important part of this election and you will have a firsthand view of what it takes to win a campaign.

Eligible students will be provided with academic credit or service hours. While these positions are unpaid, they will provide political opportunities not available elsewhere and upon completion of the program, a letter of recommendation to a future employer or college will be provided.

Interns will be expected to assist the Congressional Leadership Fund

  • Grassroots Organizing
  • Event Planning
  • Research
  • Data Entry
  • Coalition Outreach Activities
  • Voter Contacts
  • Office Management

If you have any questions or would like more information, please email Blake Hale at bhale@theclf.org.

CLF Intern Flier (Fall) — Hale[1265][9801]

Paid Internship Opportunity: Baker University Archives

The Baker University Archives is pleased to announce a 200-hour internship to assist with the arrangement and description of the Bailey Family Collection. The intern will assist the university archivist with and create a finding-aid for the collection, which is approximately 16 cubic feet in size.

College course work in history or a related discipline and an interest in archives are required. Experience using Archon, Archives Space, or a similar program is desirable. Individuals currently enrolled in a history, library science, information management, or archives management program are encouraged to apply.

Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, and list of three references to Office of Human Resources, Baker University, PO Box 65, Baldwin City, KS 66006 or by email at employment@wildcat.bakerU.edu. Attachments must be in MS Word or Adobe PDF formats. Interviews will be conducted on the Baldwin City campus. Applications will be reviewed until the position is filled. Baker University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Paid Internship Opportunity: Harry S. Truman Library

The Harry S. Truman Library is seeking college interns to assist with their education programs.

Interns will help provide an interactive museum learning experience to third graders through an educational program at the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum in Independence, Mo.

This short term paid intern opportunity is available February – April, 2018. The interns will lead groups of 3rd grade students (8/9 yrs old) and move students to stations in the museum galleries and work with students to complete tasks in those areas.

The interns will assist students in finding clues and answers within the exhibits and respond to their questions.

For more information and a full internship job description email mark.adams@nara.gov

Working as a Collection Intern at the Alexander Majors House

My first several weeks working as a collection intern at the Alexander Majors House Museum have proven to be both challenging and engaging. My past public history experience has been primarily in archives and this is the first internship where I’ve been able to work with museum objects. My initial assignment was to make an inventory of the house’s objects. This has been a bit daunting, given that there are a total of fourteen rooms and hallways, each chock-full of artifacts. The ultimate goal of the internship is to catalog all objects into the museum’s database for accession.

The most common obstacle has been my lack of knowledge about Victorian period antiquities. Fortunately, I was provided with a rough list and description of each room’s objects. With the aid of my smartphone and the internet, I researched objects on the list and compared them with objects in the house. For example, after learning about the aesthetic differences between Bristol and Old Paris vases I was able to distinguish them throughout the house.

However, there have been instances where I’ve been completely baffled by an object and its purpose. For instance, there are some odd utensils in the kitchen whose functions completely elude me. In these cases, I write the best description possible and make a note to get help identifying it later. I then take pictures of the object for later identification. Once finished, I’ll go through the house with my supervisor and reexamine those particular artifacts.

Identifying and learning about Victorian artifacts has been a rewarding experience. This knowledge will become especially useful if I plan to work at a museum dealing with this time period.

-Kevin Ploth

LaBudde Special Collection Transcription: Learning from One and Many Voices

Coming back to work on transcriptions for LaBudde after having worked on transcriptions from interviews I had conducted for the LatinxKC project has been a little bit of an adjustment. It is interesting looking at the interviews now from the perspective of having finished the oral history class as opposed to my thoughts while I was taking the class. I remember the frustration of trying to hear and sort out many voices as opposed to just one voice, but I have now come to see the place for different approaches. Having read about the therapeutic benefits of a group interview, I can see why someone might choose the more informal round table method as a way to preserve history. I can also see the benefits of a monologue and removing some of the external sources of intimidation which might threaten to question a person’s memory. One of the primary take aways I had from the oral history course was the importance of memory and finding how events felt and were remember for individuals and communities. I have noticed that one benefit of a relaxed group is that the group self corrects some of the flows in memory in such a way that it allows for the speaker to preserve their memory of the event in a less threatened way. Although the little group may correct each other on the dates, the shared community of the group, particularly in the lesbian round table interview I’m working with, seems to be very conscious and sensitive towards the feelings and memories of the other group members. Yet, I have also found that self correction occures for individuals without the group, such as in the monologue I have transcribed. The difference is that a group self correcting often becomes chaotic and the very corrections the group wishes to impose can be lost within the jumble of words, laughter, and jesting which are usual benefits of such groups. The individual on the other hand, when self correcting, is limited to their own conflicting recollection, and although more understandable, the corrections can still result in relatively jumbled and uncertain conclusions. What the monologue style confession does give is a free flow of what the narrator finds important. I say confession, because with the existence of the microphone, the narrator is still very aware that they are speaking to other people and wants to please those listeners. They must do so, however, without those listeners being there to give supportive listening cues or to directly participate in the guiding of the conversation. So, in some ways, the monologue is the most authentic confession of the person’s memories and values of what was important. But in other ways, the lack of a living person and the smile or nod of their head, can leave narrators monologueing to expectations which are not even there.

The group interview, in contrast, would appear to have the greatest level of interruptions, tangents, and outright questioning of the narrator’s memory. Yet, the comfort of having friends and a shared sense of support and community in the group interview of the lesbian round table allowed the speakers to question each other without fear. Thus, despite the frequent outbursts of laughter and side comments, the group is comfortable and most members are able to reflect on the events and what it felt like to them.

On a more critical note, I do not believe I would prefer to conduct either of the interview forms I’ve been transcribing. The monologue, while therapeutic and potentially more comfortable for the speaker, holds potential pitfalls in the assumption that the narrator will no longer be nervous with the living person being removed and the cold inanimate judgment of the tape recorder remaining. Yet, if I had gotten an interview with the narrator (which was the case of the monologue) then a monologue might allow the narrator to speak and contradict me in a safer nonconfrontational format. This is a worthy benefit, especially if there were conflicting memories and perspectives of events and places between the interview and the monologue’s account.

I also do no believe I’d want to do the group interview either, but for different reasons. Although the group interview could be more comfortable and allow for womens voices to be presented in a more natural and freeing way, the difficulty of hearing such voices can be a problem. Although the group interview provides a great sense of the group’s relationships and community, as well as still effectively conveying key points if the narrators’ views, it can also lose the particular views and memories of some of the individual members. The group reflection allows for sparked memories to be added to the narrative and a weaving of stories and fragments into a group sense of shared experience. The individual strands and story treads which contribute to the overall weave are visible, but can be lost in the blending of so many stories and threads. I have noticed that some of the quieter narrators in the group interview tend to be overtalked and some individuals with differing perspectives can be ganged up on by more vocal or forceful speakers. Some of the softer spoken narrators can be lost in the midst of background jesting or bombastic laughter. While creating a great sense of the group and allowing a format which sparks recollections, reflections, and additional details to stories, the different individual perspectives and memory of events can be lost in a group interview. Most of this is because the additional details and freedom to jump in create overtalking. More importantly, the round table group interview was so comfortable that it allowed some narrators to jump in late in the recording, or suddenly appear on record when they had silently been participating the whole time. The increase of influencing factors and visual cues present in the round table makes an audio recording confusing to listen to. Without a visual recording included with the audio it is, at times, nearly impossible to know who and what is being talked to or about. Individual interviews with each person would have allowed for much deeper and complete interviews in many ways, esoecially for the more timid speakers. Again, the group interview does provides a sense of the groups memory and also allows for contributions to each other stories by the narrators in ways which cannot be discounted. Yet, without individual interviews, I can’t help but wonder if the stories told by the group are those the quieter members would have told on their own, or if the stronger members of the group, with the best of intentions or without even knowing it, guided the group into a memory distinctly imprinted with their leadership.