Celebrating Our Namesake: The Leadership and Legacy of Henry Bloch

Henry W. Bloch (1922-2019) was a devoted friend and supporter of several institutions in Kansas City, but none more so than the school that bears his name: the Henry W. Bloch School of Management at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

In 2011, he and his wife, Marion, established the Marion and Henry Bloch Family Foundation, dedicated to improving the Greater Kansas City area. The foundation focuses on seven areas, ranging from social services to education for the poor, disadvantaged and underserved to the family’s “legacy organizations.”

Some people close to Henry have compared his dedication to serving Kansas City in multiple facets to the holistic care of the mind, body and soul. And that is reflected in the family foundation’s priorities: the mind’s focus has been the Bloch School, the body served through Saint Luke’s Health System and the soul with the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

Henry Bloch studied at UMKC, then known as University of Kansas City, before graduating from the University of Michigan in 1944. As a former student, Henry had a natural affinity for UMKC. He endowed the former UMKC School of Business in 1986, and the name was changed to Henry W. Bloch School of Management in 2010.

“Henry’s vision was for the Bloch School to serve Kansas City by pursuing excellence. His vision was for us to serve as Kansas City’s Business School, supporting the start-ups, the established firms, and the non-profit and governmental organizations that are all critical to our community’s well-being,” said Brian Klaas, Ph.D., dean of the Bloch School. “Because of Henry, the Bloch School has developed world-class programs, attracted outstanding faculty and staff, and provided opportunities to students from all walks of life. Henry’s life will serve as our inspiration, reminding us to work hard, take risks, fly right, and do good.”

Henry’s hope has been for the Bloch School to be considered a center of excellence for UMKC and Kansas City, creating leaders and the next generation of entrepreneurs by recruiting top students from around the country.

In 2013, Henry attended the school’s 60th anniversary celebration. He recalled a challenge that he issued in 1986 when he endowed the school. “I challenged the school to strive to be the best, to achieve greatness,” he said at the celebration. “Today, I am proud to be able to stand here before you and witness that success.”

Following Henry’s vision, the Bloch School of Management has a strategic focus on twin pillars of excellence: entrepreneurship and innovation in the for-profit sector and social entrepreneurship and innovation in the public and nonprofit sector.

His support over the years has manifested in many ways, including the creation of the state-of-the-art Henry W. Bloch Executive Hall for Entrepreneurship and Innovation in 2013. This building came to fruition thanks to a $32 million gift from Henry to further elevate the Bloch School as a world leader in educating and training future generations of leaders.

Over the years, Henry loved to come to the school for impromptu visits with faculty, staff and, especially, students. Students in the Bloch School’s Entrepreneurship Scholars program in past years found Henry to be a familiar and welcome fixture in classes and at campus events, always ready with a thoughtful question or a timely suggestion.

At the 2013 graduation ceremony for the scholars, he said “as a retired CEO, I can tell you the view from the top is pleasant and satisfying. But the never-to-be-forgotten excitement, the fun and challenge, is in the climb.”

Bloch Associate Professor Brent Never interviewed

Photos by Photos by Brandon Parigo, Strategic Marketing and Communications

NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt broadcast live from Kansas City on Thursday, Oct. 11. Brent Never, associate professor of public affairs at the UMKC Henry W. Bloch School of Management, was interviewed for a story that aired during the show.

The story is about the historic role Troost Avenue has played in Kansas City as a physical and symbolic dividing line.

Never calls himself an urban geographer. His work includes identifying communities underserved by human services and he teaches courses in research methods, public policy analysis, program evaluation and public-private partnerships.

In a 2016 UMKC Bloch Magazine article, Never said he is concerned about equity in the availability of services. His research looks at ways to identify situations in which services are not readily available to people in need. And he contends that geography has a profound influence on where service providers locate.

Photos by Photos by Brandon Parigo, Strategic Marketing and Communications

“As a community, Kansas City has stark boundaries: Troost Avenue, the state line, the Missouri River,” he said in the article.

As a professor, Never’s work also includes introducing students to gentrification within cities, showing them the history and talking about the legacy. He and other UMKC professors often take their students out in the community. He said young people value the history of Kansas City, and are determined to make some positive changes.

“Kansas City is a city of neighborhoods,” Never said. “At UMKC, we’re a city university. Our students need to feel this community is part of the university.”

Bloch Re-Branded


New visual identity showcases Kansas City’s business school

UMKC’s Bloch School of Management unveiled its new brand and marketing campaign on Oct. 2, accompanied by T-shirt giveaways, retro music, a barbecue lunch and lots of selfies. The campaign will roll out across the city, starting the week of Oct. 8.

Dean Brian Klaas, with help from his school’s namesake Henry Bloch and son Tom Bloch, hosted the brand reveal party as students, faculty and staff gathered for the outdoors event on an unusually warm and breezy day.

From this day forward, Klaas told the crowd, we at Bloch are claiming “We Are Kansas City’s Business School.”

Bloch has been working on a rebrand for several months with the Kansas City-based marketing firm, Trozzolo, and the UMKC Strategic Marketing and Communications team. The project, funded by the Bloch Family Foundation, called for developing a new brand identity for Bloch to elevate awareness among prospective students and the greater Kansas City community. The project included feedback from campus and community via focus groups, quantitative surveys and input from current students, faculty and staff at Bloch.

Klaas laid out the core ideas of the brand identity at the Oct. 2 event.

“We are proclaiming that the Bloch School gives students the belief, the courage and the tools to build businesses, shape communities and lead the future,” he said. “We are committed to growing Kansas City’s leadership. Our students are this community’s future.”

Furthermore, he said, our students benefit from:

  • Our long-standing, deep connections to the Kansas City community, including global organizations headquartered here.
  • Our strong alumni network offers a welcoming community for Kansas City’s future business leaders, and opportunities for connections across the globe.
  • A curriculum powered by the innovative and civic mindset inspired by Henry W. Bloch, which is so relevant in today’s world. The result is a higher return on their educational investment than students can find anywhere else.

For those accustomed to UMKC’s signature blue and gold, the campaign adds a new twist: A bold, resonant orange. The orange was inspired by design elements within the ground-breaking Bloch Entrepreneurship Hall and because it partners so well with UMKC’s traditional colors.

An orange square and accent color will be featured, along with blue and gold, in ads, billboards and social media – and even in a life-size acrylic orange block that will be featured at community events and used as a way to engage the public at community events.

“It …is an instantly recognizable symbol of all that we stand for,” Klaas proclaimed.

Indeed, the orange color was a standout feature of the human-size selfie booth at the launch event. Large, stacked orange blocks proclaimed, #WeAreBloch. The display anchored one side of the outdoor plaza between the Bloch Legacy Building and the Bloch Entrepreneurship Hall. Students and staff clustered around Henry Bloch for photos.
For each selfie posted to Bloch’s Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts, a donation will be made to a scholarship fund for Bloch students.
Reactions to the new brand? One student called the campaign “dope” – fresh and modern.

Vice Chancellor Anne Hartung Spenner noted that the community-wide rollout of the campaign will begin the week of Oct. 8.

“You will see Bloch’s new brand across the greater Kansas City metro area and beyond – from billboards to bus wraps, from social media to digital ads,” she said. “Just like our Bloch students and our more than 10,000 alumni in the area, you’ll see us everywhere.”

Bloch Faculty Win National Award on Data Analytics

Alteryx, Inc. a company working to revolutionize business through data science and analytics, announced the 2018 Alteryx Analytics Excellence Award winners and new ACE program members at the company’s annual Inspire Conference on June 7. Two Bloch faculty members were selected amongst the winners, who will share $25,000 to be donated to their charity of choice, in recognition of their commitment to the communities around them.

Jim DeLisle, Ph.D. Academic Director of the Lewis White Real Estate Center and Associate Professor of Real Estate

Brent Never, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor of Nonprofit Leadership

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jim DeLisle, Ph.D., Academic Director of the Lewis White Real Estate Center and Associate Professor of Real Estate and Brent Never, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Nonprofit Leadership, drove a project that employed core functionalities of the Alteryx platform to harness the power of millions of disparate data points generated by Smart Cities, empowering city leaders to make smart decisions for allocating scarce resources. This year, the team began using Alteryx to teach students data analytics and to leverage open data to solve an intractable problem for many cities: abandoned housing and blighted neighborhoods.

To read the full case, click here.

Remembering Jack D. Heysinger

Dean Emeritus Jack Heysinger speaking to UMKC students

Jack D. Heysinger, Dean Emeritus of the Henry W. Bloch School of Management, died June 4, 2018 at the age of 95.

Heysinger served as dean and Siegmund Harzfeld Professor for 16 years. Following his service as dean, he returned to teaching full time, retiring in 1991. Heysinger was also a lifetime donor to UMKC, with regular gifts supporting students in financial need.

Continue reading

Remembering Kate Spade

The Bloch School is saddened by the passing of Kate Spade on June 5, 2018.

Spade, a native Kansas Citian and award-winning fashion designer and trendsetter, was the 2007 recipient of the Bloch School’s International Entrepreneur of the Year Award, as well as a 2017 inductee into the Entrepreneur Hall of Fame.

“Kate Spade truly embodied the entrepreneurial spirit. She was a brilliant, innovative creator, but she also understood that effort and determination mattered just as much as talent,” said Jeff Hornsby, Ph.D., Henry W. Bloch/Missouri Endowed Chair, Department of Entrepreneurship and Innovation; and Director, Regnier Institute for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. “Her success and passion for entrepreneurship is why she was selected for the Entrepreneur Hall of Fame. She was a terrific role model for our entrepreneurship students and community. She will be greatly missed.”

Bloch Student Team Places Second at CSBS Competition

A team of five Bloch School undergraduate students – Alison Irwin, Justin Loerts, Mason Paulus, Tristan Perkins, and Conrad Schrof – took the second-place prize at the 2018 Community Bank Case Study Competition sponsored by the Conference of State Bank Supervisors (CSBS).

The student team, advised by Finance Faculty Members Bill Keeton and Forest Myers, analyzed how community banks are using technology to streamline processes and better serve their customers. Each team in the competition produced a paper and video based on interviews with management of a partner bank and other experts. The Bloch team advanced to the finals through two rounds of judging, competing against 50 other teams from 44 universities nationwide.

The Bloch team partnered with Citizens Bank & Trust, which provided vital insights and connected the students with the CEO of Jack Henry and Associates and other leadership.

“This year’s competition has been very exciting due to sheer volume and the high quality of case studies,” said CSBS Senior Executive Vice President Michael Stevens. “It is a wonderful way to highlight student work and gain insights to how banks are deploying technology.”

Each student on the Bloch School team will receive a $500 CSBS scholarship. The team’s paper will also appear in the Journal of Community Bank Studies, a journal published by the CSBS to showcase the work of the top three undergraduate teams.

“The CSBS competition has been a great opportunity for Bloch School students to get out of the ivory tower and learn about real-world banking, said faculty adviser,” Bill Keeton.  “It’s just one example of the synergies possible between the Bloch School and the vibrant financial services sector in Kansas City.”

Music, Movement and a Message

H3 Enterprise wins 2018 RVCC

H3 Enterprise is announced as winner of the 2018 Regnier Venture Creation Challenge. Photos by Brandon Parigo, Division of Strategic Marketing and Communications.

Educational Hip Hop firm wins Regnier Venture Creation Challenge

Roy Scott was a hard-edged rapper whose music, he freely admits, promoted drugs and violence and disrespected women.

That was until he heard his five-year-old son repeating his lyrics. It was a life-changing moment, and he resolved to take his music in a completely different, socially responsible direction.

The result is H3 Enterprise (Healthy Hip Hop), a program that conveys positive messages about education and health to a powerful hip-hop beat. During a presentation in early May at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, he called it “Sesame Street for the 21st century.”

Continue reading

Bloch Students Select Faculty Impact Award Winners

Each year, the Bloch School recognizes two faculty members who make lasting impressions on our students’ lives. Each spring, students vote for the faculty members who have had the most positive impact on them throughout their career at the Bloch School.

This year we are honored to award Nathan Mauck, Ph.D. and Doranne Hudson, MBA as Bloch School Graduate and Undergraduate Faculty Impact Award Winners (respectively).

Continue reading

SeniorVu is the Focus of UMKC’s Annual Case Competition

Undergraduate Bloch School student teams present their case analyses for SeniorVu

SeniorVu was the focus of the Ninth Annual Strategic Management Case Competition, where undergraduate students perform a holistic analysis of a real-life case and provide recommendations to a leadership panel of the case organization’s leadership and Kansas City area executives. Those business leaders then judge the groups on everything from research to communication skills.

“We were honored to have had this group of bright young minds digging into what could be a new business opportunity for SeniorVu,” CEO Tim Donnelly said.  “Their thoughtful research into the senior living industry and into what we do at SeniorVu sparked several great ideas for our company.”

Continue reading