Rooftop Roundtable for Scholarships

Our very own Ted Seligson laying down some truths at the Rooftop Roundtable last night! The event was organized by the Kansas City Architectural Foundation, and also featured Susan Richards Johnson, Kite Singleton and Steve Paul (as well as 80 attendees!). KCAF does good work raising money for scholarships for local architecture students. If you’d like to learn more (and maybe apply for a scholarship), visit https://www.aiakc.org/about/kansas-city-architectural-foundation

J. ONeil Cole student presentation

AUPD congratulates Pendulum Studio on 10 year anniversary!

Congrats to Jonathan, Devan and Pendulum Studio on 10 years well spent!

Ten years ago, architect Jonathan O’Neil Cole was kind enough to donate his time to work with our Urban Planning and Design students on a 3-day charrette exploring how to (re)connect 18th and Vine to the Crossroads (sound familiar?)…

This month his firm with Devan Case celebrates ten years in the business.

Congratulations!!!

In the spring of 2007, we worked with Jonathan and guest designer Walter Hood of Hood Studio to explore four themes that would help to bridge the gap between east and west along 18th Street: Architecture, Infrastructure, Monument and Landscape – a four part design process informed by the 4/4 time signature of Kansas City jazz. It was a blast and we all enjoyed working with Jonathan, Walter and a variety of awesome designers. You can check out the work here: http://acityatthecrossroads.umkc.edu/plan.html

Recent alumni honoree Stephen Risse and KCMO city planner Ashley Winchell were among the students that participated.

Thanks to Pendulum and all of the Kansas City firms that make our studio-based design pedagogy possible.

 

 

First-Year Planning Field Trip

During our fourth annual planning field trip with first-year students in the Urban Planning + Design program, we finally made it to the Kansas City, Missouri City Hall observation deck (it was closed during previous trips).  After speaking with a planner on the 15th floor, we walked to Louis Berger to learn what AUP+D alums are working on. We rode the streetcar to Union Station and walked to lunch at Crown Center before returning to campus on the Main MAX bus.

Clara Irazábal merges pursuit of social justice and equity in two areas

Clara Irazábal is settling into her new roles as director of the Latina/Latino Studies (LLS) Program and professor of Urban Planning at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where she combines these roles to pursue social justice and spatial equity.

“These positions allow me to teach, research and serve while addressing the urban challenges our communities face,” said Irazábal.

“I feel mutually connected and devoted to both areas, and my classes at UMKC will have components from urban planning and Latinx Studies, including exploration of issues of economic and community development; affordable and inclusionary housing; and sustainability and resilience for the Latinx communities and other minoritized groups in Kansas City and beyond,” she said. “Not only will we learn to identify and analyze the challenges, but most importantly, rehearse solutions for them while empowering communities.”

Irazábal has conducted her planning research in Latinx communities in the United States and in countries of Latin America, including Venezuela, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Caribbean. Throughout her career, she has been motivated by her concern for understanding social justice struggles as displayed in the transformation of urban space, which has allowed her to share her experiences and expertise with communities.

“I have conducted the majority of my urban planning research in the Latinx community. It sets the stage for how to improve practices and the well-being of the entire community, beyond Latinxs,” said Irazábal. “I know here in Kansas City there’s a Troost divide, which the city has not yet overcome. We need to integrate both sides of the community,” she said.

Irazábal explained the rapidly-growing term ‘Latinx’ (pronounced Latin X) as an all-inclusive term. When using ‘Latina or Latino,” some individuals might be excluded. Latinx includes individuals who do not identify as women or men in the LGBTQ community.

The new UMKC Center for Neighborhoods in the Department of Architecture, Urban Planning + Design is an example of where she can merge the two areas of research and engage the community.

“The goal of the center is to promote community development by training leaders, and allowing them to select projects they wish to work on,” Irazábal said. “The Center just graduated its first cohort of trainees, which includes neighborhood leaders and police officers. There is much hope for the LLS and the Center for Neighborhoods as instruments for community development, representing opportunities to learn how to work better, collaborate and create synergies,” she said.

Since her arrival in July, Irazábal has been attending meetings and learning about more initiatives at UMKC, which she will support.

“I have already attended meetings with the UMKC Hispanic Advisory Board and was impressed by how invested its members are in the LLS Program and UMKC at large, as well as their energy when promoting the university and our students,” she said. She has learned about upcoming Division of Diversity and Inclusion programs, including the Social Justice Book and Lecture Series, the Agapito Mendoza Scholarship Breakfast and the Avanzando program.

“Each of these is critical to the success of our students and to celebrate and reach out to the community,” she said.

Irazábal has some specific thoughts about enhancing the LLS Program, which include opportunities for growth.

“I want the program to mature and expand and offer an integrated graduate certificate, a Latina/Latino Studies major and eventually a master’s degree,” she said. “Also, I want the program to include Latina/Latino and Latin Americas Studies, attracting students and faculty to increase visibility and impact in the community,” she said. “I want the program to have a larger presence in our community and for the community to be engaged with us.”

Having arrived at UMKC by way of Columbia University in the City of New York, where she taught and conducted research for eight years, Irazábal worked with the Institute of Latin American Studies and collaborated with the Centers for Brazilian, Mexican and Caribbean Studies.

“Latinxists and Latin Americanists – researchers, teachers and activists – came together to create a synergy, a dialog, an enrichment to communities and students,” she said. “I want to stimulate that here at UMKC.”

While not in the classroom this semester, Irazábal will take the time to be become more familiar with UMKC and the LLS program before teaching in the spring.

“I will teach Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies. It will be a good way to get to know the students and for them to know me,” she said. “Later, I will teach Urban Planning and Latino Studies, which will help students understand community development and the LLS. It will have an impact on the minority community. That course is still being developed,” said Irazábal. She also wants to ensure the students continue to grow their research skills, including investigating, developing and testing hypotheses.

Invoking a line from poet June Jordan – “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for” – and a phrase from activists César Chávez and Dolores Huerta – “Sí se puede (yes we can),” Irazábal illustrated her sense of mission and vision for what she and the community can do together.

Wandra Brooks Green, Division of Strategic Marketing and Communications

Photo credit: Brandon Parigo, Strategic Marketing and Communications

Reposted from UMKC’s blog.

Urban Planning + Design in the News!

Five do-gooders quietly make it easier for KC to heart itself
By David Hudnall @davidhudnall / excerpt from: The Pitch, 2/10/15

idris

Photos by Angela C. Bond

Idris Raoufi, 2013 Urban Planning + Design Alumnus
816 Bicycle Collective
The past couple of years, we’ve marked Valentine’s Day by talking to our crushes: men and women around town who are doing things cool enough to make us swoon a little. This year, we went looking for people who had crushes of their own: on the city. We’re not talking about garden-variety hometown-priders, the “I share too much pro-KC clickbait on Facebook” types. We mean folks who spend their time actively contributing to the improvement of Kansas City and its citizens.
The five individuals we picked — and yes, we know, our list is a couple of thousand people short — direct their energy toward a variety of civic endeavors, from battling predatory lenders to educating teenagers through theater about HIV/AIDS. What they have in common: They impress and inspire us. We hope they impress and inspire you, too.

 Idris Raoufi’s views on urban planning in Kansas City border on bleak.

“KC is one of the most underplanned municipalities in the United States,” Raoufi says. “We’re 30 years behind the curve with land use, neighborhood preservation, municipal services, community health. There’s been almost no emphasis on planning for the future.”

But even in challenging environments, dedicated souls tend to locate niches in which a difference might be made. Raoufi’s niche: the 816 Bicycle Collective, where he focuses his energy when he’s not working his day job as a transportation planner for Wilson & Co., an engineering and architecture firm.

The 816 Bicycle Collective is a free community bike shop, staffed by volunteers who repair bikes and teach commuters how to do the same: how to adjust the brakes, how to change a flat, how to fix a derailleur, even how to build a bike from scratch. “People who rely on a bike to get to work — many of whom realistically can’t afford to ride the bus — are in large part the people who visit us,” Raoufi says. “There’s a large population of people in this city that gets around by bike, and our main function is to empower those people with the knowledge to fix their own bikes.”

Raoufi co-founded the collective in 2008 with Suzanne Hogan, Kirk McDowell-Shafer, Bri Lauterbach and Sean Eagan. For now, it’s located in a back alleyway off Troost, at 3116 Forest. But in late spring or early summer, it’s moving to a more visible location, in the Union Hill neighborhood. Two years ago, at the Jackson County delinquent-tax auction, the organization purchased three buildings near the corner of 31st Street and Cherry.

“We got these three buildings on the same parcel in incredible condition, in a great location,” Raoufi says. “We had no intention of actually getting them. But nobody else bid on them.”

Thanks to donations at the shop, heavily discounted services from a friendly contractor and $32,000 netted from a 2013 crowdfunding campaign, the 816 Bicycle Collective has gradually renovated the properties. The new space will be multifaceted, housing the collective as well as its parent organization, the KC Bicycle Federation. The goal is to have leasable spaces in the other buildings that will generate revenue to fund the operations of the bike collective and pay for expenses associated with upkeep. “Ideally, we’d be leasing to like-minded nonprofits,” Raoufi says.

A self-sustaining hub for cycling advocacy: not bad for a town that historically has been less-than-progressive on transportation issues.
“There’s a lot you can do here that you can’t do in other cities,” Raoufi says, sounding a little more optimistic. “It’s why the collective has been able to do what it’s done so far. The work I’m passionate about is taking technical abilities I learned in school and helping advance disenfranchised communities to take better hold of the development of their neighborhoods. If you tried to do that in lots of other cities, you’d be dealing with higher real estate [costs], scarcer resources, more competition. This is a city of great opportunity if you’re aware of it.”

excerpt from: The Pitch, 2/10/15
http://www.pitch.com/kansascity/five-do-gooders-quietly-make-it-easier-for-kc-to-heart-itself/Content?oid=5052842

Entrepreneurial Scholar: Joohae Yoon, Urban Planning + Design

yoohae

I am a student from South Korea. I have started my degree in 2011, as an Environmental Horticulture major at the University of Seoul. I was deeply interested in urban ecology, plant remediation and urban environmental systems.
My first visit to the U.S happened in fall, 2012. I applied for several different universities in other states as an exchange student but the only acceptance letter I received was from a state I have never heard of, Missouri. I researched this place for days and nights but still wasn’t sure if I could really like this place. But when I arrived, soon enough, the world turned around, introducing me to new experiences that I would have never had.
That’s when I first encountered the concept of entrepreneurship. I have been keeping my eyes on launching a start-up business ever since. Magazines like Entrepreneur, INC magazine and Forbes became one of my favorite pastime. I am now studying Urban Planning and Design at UMKC and an active member and a project leader of UMKC Enactus, a college students’ international non-profit organization dedicated to enabling progress through entrepreneurial action. I am in the process of gaining experience needed to launch a startup business. Getting selected as a recipient of UM System’s ESI program is an honor, and will help me improve my entrepreneurial skills as I prepare to start my own business, here in my 2nd home.

UM System names first class in its Entrepreneurial Scholars and Interns Program
Students from all four campuses will have a unique opportunity to enhance their entrepreneurship skills

COLUMBIA, Mo. – The University of Missouri System today announced the selection of the first 15 students to be part of the inaugural class of the UM System Entrepreneurial Scholars and Interns program. Starting in the spring semester, students will begin taking approved entrepreneurial-related courses to be followed by a 10-week, paid summer internship. This exclusive program provides the students with a strong academic foundation in entrepreneurship as well as the opportunity to learn from a mentor or work within a startup company.

“Entrepreneurial experiences for students, at such a young age, is huge for the state,” University of Missouri System President Tim Wolfe said. “By creating this culture on our campuses—one that encourages innovation—we will produce well-educated entrepreneurs that will power Missouri’s 21st Century economy.”
The goal of the program is to create a steady stream of entrepreneurs around the state capable of taking their cutting-edge ideas to the market as new business ventures. Creating this new wave of well-educated entrepreneurs in Missouri will benefit the local, regional and national economies.
“Increasing research and economic development activity is integral to our strategic plan,” UM System Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs, Research and Economic Development Hank Foley said. “This opportunity for our students to collaborate with a like-minded cohort will be an engine for the state’s vitality in the coming years.”
The program introduces students from different degree programs on each of the four system campuses to entrepreneurial principles and practices and creates a network of connections centered on entrepreneurship. The application process was open to all undergraduate students on all four campuses. In total, 38 applications were received from disciplines ranging from journalism, environmental engineering, nursing and graphic design. Below is the list of students, their degree program and campus affiliation:
Natasha Brewer, Journalism, MU
Audrey Engel, Marketing, UMSL
Drew Forster, Agribusiness Management, MU
Teresa Frank, Business Finance, UMSL
Connor Hall, Finance, MU
Josh Jetter, Electrical & Computer Engineering, Missouri S&T
John Larrick, Finance & Real Estate, MU
Kimberly Miller, Entrepreneurship, UMKC
Andrew Neely, Business, UMSL
Erik O’Riley, Mechanical Engineering, Missouri S&T
Mary Puleo, Environmental Engineering, Missouri S&T
Nick Rollins, Information Science & Technology, Missouri S&T
Alexander Sweeney, Computer Science, UMKC
Aaron Vonderhaar, Mechanical Engineering, Missouri S&T
Joohae Yoon, Urban Planning & Design, UMKC

Excerpt from UM System press release 12/19/2014

A City at the Crossroads: 18th Street

In the spring semester 2007, the Department was able to receive funding from the NEH and the Graham Foundation to bring in Walter Hood to conduct a charrette focused on the 18th Street corridor from 18th and Vine to the Crossroads. 360 Architecture hosted the 2 day charrette and professionals from the city joined students in four teams that set out to generate new ideas for the 18th Street corridor focused on Landscape, Infrastructure, Architecture and Landmarks. Hood employed a charrette framework based on the 4/4 beat of Kansas City jazz, inspiring each team to generate at least 48 ideas for the corridor.

UMKC Conservatory: Connections, Opportunities and Constraints

Date: December 10, 2014
Time: 2:30-4:30 pm
Location:

Katz Hall, Rm. 101

Students in Urban Planning + Design Studio I are exploring the opportunities and constraints of site planning and urban design on blocks immediately adjacent (East, South, and West) to the UMKC Conservatory Site in the Crossroads and Westside neighborhoods of Downtown Kansas City, Missouri.

free and open to the public / parking can be found directly west of Katz Hall in the metered lot. There is also on street parking directly north of the building on 50th Street.

graphic above from the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance Downtown Campus Design Charrette, September 2014, BNIM Architects


Pavilion Project: 1st Year Studio

Date: December 10, 2014
Time: 9am - 12pm
Location:

Come join the first year students for their final design review. The students have been asked to design a small, free-standing pavilion to accommodate one of two potential uses: a studio for an artist who specializes in nature themes, or a research station for a scientist. The pavilion is to be used by the client to both work privately and to periodically make presentations to the public. It is intended to be a teaching tool to the school children and the general public who visit the Anita B Gorman Discovery Center, at 4750 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Missouri.

Katz Hall, room 101

free and open to the public


Planning Studio: UMKC Performing Arts Campus

Date: December 15, 2014
Time: 3:00 - 6:00pm
Location:

122 Southwest Blvd., Kansas City, MO

The Urban Planning + Design III studio has been working on a comprehensive plan for the work associated with the UMKC Performing Arts Campus downtown. Key questions being asked: How will this campus be integrated into and enhance three communities: institutional; professional; public both physically and programmatically?

The site for the UMKC Performing Arts Campus is at site that covers a full city block bounded by Broadway, Central, 17th and 18th streets, directly south of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. The UMKC effort  represents a multi-decade plan that was identified as one of the civic priorities for the region by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce.

free and open to the public

funded by: the UMKC Conservatory of Music and Dance