Statement of Solidarity with the African American Community

The UMKC Department of Architecture, Urban Planning and Design (AUPD) stands in solidarity with the African American community and communities of color in Kansas City and nationwide against racism and injustice.

The deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Eric Garner and too many others, and the police brutality that continues to threaten the quality of life in American cities, is untenable.

We are deeply concerned for the safety of our students, our neighborhood partners and leaders, our colleagues, and their families.

We know that many African American families have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID19 pandemic and were already suffering from great personal and family losses. Our heart goes out to you – our colleagues, friends and neighbors.

As educators and professionals, we are well aware of our responsibility to promote the values of equity and social justice. Hate, white supremacy, and racism have no place in our society – and especially in the public institutions that have been established to serve and protect.

The American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) Code of Ethics makes it abundantly clear that social justice is our responsibility:

We shall seek social justice by working to expand choice and opportunity for all persons, recognizing a special responsibility to plan for the needs of the disadvantaged and to promote racial and economic integration. We shall urge the alteration of policies, institutions, and decisions that oppose such needs.[i]

The American Institute of Architects has also adopted policies and programs related to equity, diversity and inclusion.[ii] We support the local and national American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the American Planning Association (APA) statements against racism and violence against African Americans and communities of color. We urge these professional organizations to invest significant financial and professional resources to help rebuild urban neighborhoods equitably, to fight racism within the professions across the country, and to expand access to planning and architecture for marginalized communities.

The AUPD faculty commit ourselves to anti-racism as a core principle of our approach to social justice in our teaching, research and service. The UMKC Center for Neighborhoods in AUPD reaffirms its mission to serve the Kansas City community, including many neighborhoods that have struggled to survive and thrive despite generations of disinvestment and racially-biased policies, through research and outreach.

For more information, please contact: 816-235-1725.

[i] https://www.planning.org/ethics/ethicscode/

[ii] https://www.aia.org/resources/24301-equity-diversity-and-inclusion

Billie Hufford

Senior UPD Billie Hufford Recognized as a Spring 2018 Honor Recipient

Senior Urban Planning + Design major Billie Hufford has been selected as one of 19 Spring 2018 Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Honor Recipients. Graduating students are recognized for their leadership and service to UMKC and the community. Billie and the other award recipients will be celebrated at a breakfast on May 11.

Billie Hufford is a dedicated student and outstanding leader. I’ve observed her dedication and leadership in and out of the classroom, particularly her assistance and mentoring of other students. As a nontraditional student, Billie has brought her wide variety of experience to multiple organizations at UMKC, including the LGBTQIA Affairs Council, the Student Activity Fee Committee (SAFC), Planning + Design Students (PDS), and the UMKC chapter of the American Public Works Association (APWA). Billie applied the knowledge she gained with SAFC to PDS and APWA, connecting more students to resources and professional development opportunities. She has been an active participant of and ambassador for the UMKC Undergraduate Research program. Billie has translated the knowledge and skills she’s acquired from her studies at UMKC to improve Kansas City neighborhoods through volunteer efforts with the Northeast Office of the Mattie Rhodes Center and the Marlborough Community Coalition’s Economic Development Board. Billie has also volunteered with other local organizations, including KCUR, Cultivate KC, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and multiple LGBTQIA organizations, including annual participation in AIDS Walk Kansas City.

Billie graduates this month with a B.A. in Urban Planning + Design, a Sustainability minor, and an undergraduate GIS certificate. After graduation Billie will begin her new position with the City of Grandview as a planner and building inspector.

Transit Driven Thinking

from UMKC Communications 5/17/2017

Nichols Student Prize contestants inspired by streetcar extension

Kansas City’s new streetcar is already driving development activity along its route. So with an election to decide on an extension plan in the offing, it’s only natural to imagine what changes in the city’s urban environment could follow.

Students in the Urban Planning and Design Studio II course at the University of Missouri-Kansas City took on that challenge, and did more than merely imagine the possibilities. The class, taught by faculty members Michael Frisch, AICP and Ted Seligson, FAIA researched existing land uses along the extension route, selected specific intersections, designed transit-driven developments at those locations that would meet community needs, and drafted implementation plans for their concepts. The student proposals were entered in the annual J.C. Nichols Student Prize competition sponsored by the Department of Architecture, Urban Planning and Design, part of UMKC’s College of Arts and Sciences. Funding for the Nichols Student Prize has been generously provided by the Miller Nichols Charitable Foundation.

Each student selected a strategic node on Main Street from 30th Street to the UMKC campus.

At 31st and Main, Alex Gilbertson envisioned Warwick Ridge, an iconic building composed of stacked, cantilevered and offset layers, with luxury apartments atop first-floor retail shops.

At Linwood and Main, Rawya Alrammah called for a return to historical levels of housing density, with multiple apartment buildings over underground parking, surrounding an open central courtyard.

Billie Hufford recommended an emphasis on enhanced retail services at Armour and Main, anchored by a new Main Market food hall with dozens of micro-businesses in stalls on a first floor that could be opened to the elements in good weather; apartments would occupy the upper floors.

At that same intersection, Thomas Kimmel’s concept focused on adding a variety of housing types to an under-utilized 13-acre tract behind a school and Home Depot, tied together with a pedestrian concourse dubbed “The Circuit.”

A few blocks to the south, Sean Thomas sought to tie together the intersections of 39th and Main with Main and Westport to create a pedestrian-friendly “harmonious urbanism” that would reclaim areas sacrificed to automotive traffic and parking.

Taylor Vande Velde looked at 43rd and Main and saw an intersection physically dominated by huge nearby buildings – the American Century towers and the Marriott hotel. To counter that impression, she called for a human-scaled piece of landmark architecture built along the waterway. Mill Creek Point would include ground-level retail and community space with residences above.

The Nichols Prize jury, however, was most taken with David McCumber’s concept for the intersection of Main and Emanuel Cleaver II Boulevard, and awarded him first place in the competition. His pedestrian-oriented concept, Plaza Connections, would reclaim large swaths of asphalt for human use, extend the Trolley Track Trail north of the Country Club Plaza, and add two pedestrian bridges across Brush Creek and three new apartment buildings. But the centerpiece of his concept borrows, as does the Plaza, from Seville, Spain: a half-circle hotel structure outlining a circular public plaza space. The hotel would be built on land owned by the city’s Parks Department, with ample first-floor space open to all, in a new take on public-private partnerships.

The jurors were Prof. Joy Swallow, the AUP+D Department Chair; Bill Bruning, a member of the department’s Advisory Board; Diane Burnette, director of MainCOR; and Gib Kerr of Cushman & Wakefield and the Regional Transit Alliance. They awarded third place to Vande Velde for Mill Creek Point, and second prize to Kimmel for The Circuit.

J. ONeil Cole student presentation

AUPD congratulates Pendulum Studio on 10 year anniversary!

Congrats to Jonathan, Devan and Pendulum Studio on 10 years well spent!

Ten years ago, architect Jonathan O’Neil Cole was kind enough to donate his time to work with our Urban Planning and Design students on a 3-day charrette exploring how to (re)connect 18th and Vine to the Crossroads (sound familiar?)…

This month his firm with Devan Case celebrates ten years in the business.

Congratulations!!!

In the spring of 2007, we worked with Jonathan and guest designer Walter Hood of Hood Studio to explore four themes that would help to bridge the gap between east and west along 18th Street: Architecture, Infrastructure, Monument and Landscape – a four part design process informed by the 4/4 time signature of Kansas City jazz. It was a blast and we all enjoyed working with Jonathan, Walter and a variety of awesome designers. You can check out the work here: http://acityatthecrossroads.umkc.edu/plan.html

Recent alumni honoree Stephen Risse and KCMO city planner Ashley Winchell were among the students that participated.

Thanks to Pendulum and all of the Kansas City firms that make our studio-based design pedagogy possible.

 

 

Center for Neighborhoods 2016 Annual Report

Center for Neighborhoods releases annual report.

The staff of the Center for Neighborhoods at UMKC, which is housed in the Department of Architecture, Urban Planning and Design (AUP+D) – is pleased to share the first annual report. The report explains our mission and activities in 2016 since the opening in late April. The report details our impact so far, with maps and data about the neighborhood organizations and leaders who participated in the first two cohorts of the neighborhood leadership program.

The Center would like to thank all of the supporters who made this first year such a great success.

To open a PDF copy of the report – please follow this link:

UMKC-Center-for-Neighborhoods-2016-Annual-Report

UPD Faculty present at the 2017 Community Development Workshop

Faculty from Urban Planning and Design participated in the 5th Annual Community Development Workshop in Kansas City.

The workshop was well-attended by community members, city staff, students and local professionals in community development and planning.

This year the Center for Neighborhoods was a sponsor and participant in the event.

Dr. Michael Frisch, Dr. Clara Irazabal-Zurita, Dr. annalise fonza, and Jacob Wagner all participated in an event focused on developing a shared understanding of gentrification. The session was very well-attended and participants worked in groups to generate mutual knowledge about the different definitions of gentrification as well as the implications of this controversial concept.

 

Clara Irazábal merges pursuit of social justice and equity in two areas

Clara Irazábal is settling into her new roles as director of the Latina/Latino Studies (LLS) Program and professor of Urban Planning at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, where she combines these roles to pursue social justice and spatial equity.

“These positions allow me to teach, research and serve while addressing the urban challenges our communities face,” said Irazábal.

“I feel mutually connected and devoted to both areas, and my classes at UMKC will have components from urban planning and Latinx Studies, including exploration of issues of economic and community development; affordable and inclusionary housing; and sustainability and resilience for the Latinx communities and other minoritized groups in Kansas City and beyond,” she said. “Not only will we learn to identify and analyze the challenges, but most importantly, rehearse solutions for them while empowering communities.”

Irazábal has conducted her planning research in Latinx communities in the United States and in countries of Latin America, including Venezuela, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Costa Rica, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Caribbean. Throughout her career, she has been motivated by her concern for understanding social justice struggles as displayed in the transformation of urban space, which has allowed her to share her experiences and expertise with communities.

“I have conducted the majority of my urban planning research in the Latinx community. It sets the stage for how to improve practices and the well-being of the entire community, beyond Latinxs,” said Irazábal. “I know here in Kansas City there’s a Troost divide, which the city has not yet overcome. We need to integrate both sides of the community,” she said.

Irazábal explained the rapidly-growing term ‘Latinx’ (pronounced Latin X) as an all-inclusive term. When using ‘Latina or Latino,” some individuals might be excluded. Latinx includes individuals who do not identify as women or men in the LGBTQ community.

The new UMKC Center for Neighborhoods in the Department of Architecture, Urban Planning + Design is an example of where she can merge the two areas of research and engage the community.

“The goal of the center is to promote community development by training leaders, and allowing them to select projects they wish to work on,” Irazábal said. “The Center just graduated its first cohort of trainees, which includes neighborhood leaders and police officers. There is much hope for the LLS and the Center for Neighborhoods as instruments for community development, representing opportunities to learn how to work better, collaborate and create synergies,” she said.

Since her arrival in July, Irazábal has been attending meetings and learning about more initiatives at UMKC, which she will support.

“I have already attended meetings with the UMKC Hispanic Advisory Board and was impressed by how invested its members are in the LLS Program and UMKC at large, as well as their energy when promoting the university and our students,” she said. She has learned about upcoming Division of Diversity and Inclusion programs, including the Social Justice Book and Lecture Series, the Agapito Mendoza Scholarship Breakfast and the Avanzando program.

“Each of these is critical to the success of our students and to celebrate and reach out to the community,” she said.

Irazábal has some specific thoughts about enhancing the LLS Program, which include opportunities for growth.

“I want the program to mature and expand and offer an integrated graduate certificate, a Latina/Latino Studies major and eventually a master’s degree,” she said. “Also, I want the program to include Latina/Latino and Latin Americas Studies, attracting students and faculty to increase visibility and impact in the community,” she said. “I want the program to have a larger presence in our community and for the community to be engaged with us.”

Having arrived at UMKC by way of Columbia University in the City of New York, where she taught and conducted research for eight years, Irazábal worked with the Institute of Latin American Studies and collaborated with the Centers for Brazilian, Mexican and Caribbean Studies.

“Latinxists and Latin Americanists – researchers, teachers and activists – came together to create a synergy, a dialog, an enrichment to communities and students,” she said. “I want to stimulate that here at UMKC.”

While not in the classroom this semester, Irazábal will take the time to be become more familiar with UMKC and the LLS program before teaching in the spring.

“I will teach Introduction to Latina/Latino Studies. It will be a good way to get to know the students and for them to know me,” she said. “Later, I will teach Urban Planning and Latino Studies, which will help students understand community development and the LLS. It will have an impact on the minority community. That course is still being developed,” said Irazábal. She also wants to ensure the students continue to grow their research skills, including investigating, developing and testing hypotheses.

Invoking a line from poet June Jordan – “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for” – and a phrase from activists César Chávez and Dolores Huerta – “Sí se puede (yes we can),” Irazábal illustrated her sense of mission and vision for what she and the community can do together.

Wandra Brooks Green, Division of Strategic Marketing and Communications

Photo credit: Brandon Parigo, Strategic Marketing and Communications

Reposted from UMKC’s blog.

Power Tools for Neighborhoods

CFN graduation 2016

Center for Neighborhoods celebrates first class of newly empowered leaders and advocates

The first cohort of neighborhood leaders and advocates has graduated from the new Center for Neighborhoods  at the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

The group of 26, representing 18 different Kansas City neighborhoods, spent 12 weeks in a Neighborhood Leadership Capacity Training program that started in June. Programming covered topics including neighborhood planning and development, health and safety, governance and leadership, and technology and communication.

The Center for Neighborhoods is a project of UMKC’s Department of Architecture, Urban Planning + Design. Missouri State Senator Shalonn (Kiki) Curls, a strong and early supporter of the Center, attended the graduation ceremony Aug. 29 and congratulated the neighborhood leaders, offering words of encouragement and support along with AUP+D Chair Joy Swallow, AUPD Prof. Jacob Wagner and Center for Neighborhoods Director Dina Newman.

Senator Curls graduation 2016

Missouri State Senator Shalonn (Kiki) Curls consults with Center director Dina Newman.

“We are so proud of these neighborhood leaders, advocates and residents who dedicated over two hours every Monday for 12 weeks to hone their leadership skills with the purpose of building capacity in their neighborhood associations,” Newman said. “Each neighborhood is different, so the goal of the program is to provide neighborhood leaders with a tool kit of capabilities to empower them to achieve whatever goals they set for their individual neighborhood. Our goal is for leaders and residents to be empowered, equipped and encouraged.”

The Center was created to help expand the capacity of neighborhood leaders and organizations in the Kansas City, Missouri area, providing technical assistance, leadership training and capacity building to address the challenges of neighborhood revitalization in Kansas City. The Center for Neighborhoods is located at 4747 Troost, Suite 222.

The Center will support community-based partnerships in urban planning that are the core mission of the AUP+D Department and a key component of UMKC’s urban mission.

Newman said another goal of the center is to foster collaboration among neighborhoods. By going through Center programs together, neighborhood leaders meet, form bonds and learn to become co-advocates for each other, eventually leading to a critical mass of neighborhood advocacy and activism across the city.

Before joining CFN, Dina Newman was Health Initiatives Manager and Advocate for Change at the Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council. Wagner, associate professor of Urban Planning + Design, is Faculty Director of the center. He is Director of UMKC’s Urban Studies Program.

For more information, contact the Center at neighborhoods@umkc.edu or 816-921-6931.

 

Shaping Cities: The Architect as Community Organizer

John Ruble
Moore, Ruble, Yudell Architects & Planners

Please RSVP here.

As co-founder and partner in the Santa Monica, California-based architectural firm Moore, Ruble,
Yudell, John Ruble has collaborated on a broad spectrum of residential, academic, cultural,
and urban design work in the U.S., Europe, and Asia.

Ruble examines urban design issues now confronting Kansas City and other metropolitan areas in
the latest Kivett/Seligson Lecture. Ruble also discusses his work, and that of his firm,
and its emphasis on creating meaningful, memorable, and sustainable places.

Kivett / Seligson Lecture Series, Sponsored by the UMKC Department of Architecture, Urban Planning + Design

Center for Neighborhoods welcomes first group of Neighborhood Leaders

Date: June 6, 2016
Time: 5:30 p.m.
Location:

4747 Troost


UMKC Center for Neighborhoods Welcomes First Cohort Group of Community Leaders!

Group will engage in 12 weeks of interactive classes and workshops that begin Monday June 6, 2016.

The UMKC Center for Neighborhoods in the Department of Architecture, Urban Planning + Design (AUP+D), will welcome the first group of neighborhood leaders who will participate the Center’s program. The event is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. Monday, June 6 at 4747 Troost Ave., Kansas City, Mo.

The initial cohort is the first of several groups, drawn from 35 people representing 17 neighborhoods, who will participate in the Center’s program.

Areas of focus will include: Neighborhood Governance and Leadership; Technology and Communications; Neighborhood Health and Safety; and Neighborhood Planning and Development. Cohort 1 represents neighborhoods located throughout Kansas City, Missouri and covers a wide range of neighborhoods in size, location and capacity from the Missouri River to South Kansas City.

“As an urban-serving university, UMKC has a charter-based responsibility to meet the needs of the urban population in the Kansas City region, and the Center of Neighborhoods is poised to serve as the catalyst for university-community partnerships that help meet the needs of these neighborhoods,” said Dina Newman, Director of the Center.

While Cohort 1 is full, interested neighborhood leaders are invited to sign up for Cohort 2, which is scheduled to begin in the fall.

After the kickoff event, the regularly scheduled Monday night classes will take place at Katz Hall, 5005 Rockhill Road on the UMKC campus.

For more information, please contact: Dina Newman at 816-235-6931, neighborhoods@umkc.edu or visit our website: Center website