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SEGOVIA

20/06/2017

Hoy, se pasó el día en Segovia, una ciudad en la región de Castilla y León. Cogimos un autobús por una hora desde Madrid hasta Segovia; no estaba muy lejos de Madrid con suerte. Al llegar, era una ciudad con tanta historia, casi como una vista del pasado. Es loco que los edificios se pudiera construir sin tecnología moderna hace unos siglos.

La catedral de Segovia / the Cathedral in Segovia
El acueducto de Segovia / the Aqueduct in Segovia
Primero, se vio la catedral gigante. Era la más grande que cualquiera iglesia que he visto antes.

Entonces, se vio el acueducto antiguo de la época romana de España. La geometría de esta estructura era muy bonita y se podía ver la belleza de las matemáticas.

Finalmente, se entró el castillo. No era un edificio gigante, pero los detalles de los cuartos eran lujosos. Era gracioso oir que éste fuera la casa de verano de la familia real. Nuestro guía nos dijo que el rey dijo “Madrid es para los políticos”. Yo supongo que ésta sea la razon por qué se fuera la familia real por los veranos.

No era un viaje largo, pero había mucho para ver. Que historia había. Yo espero ansiosamente por aprender más.

El castillo de Segovia / the Castle in Segovia

Natagnél

 (ved los detalles reales abajo)


June 20

Today, the day was spent in Segovia, a city in the region of Castilla & Leon. We took a bus for an hour from Madrid to Segovia; it was not very far from Madrid luckily. Upon arriving, it was a city with so much history, almost like a view of the past. It is crazy that the buildings were able to be built without modern technology a few centuries ago.

First, we saw the huge cathedral. It was bigger than any church I’ve seen before.

Then, we saw the ancient aqueduct from the Roman era of Spain. The geometry of this structure was beautiful and the beauty of the mathematics could be seen.

Finally, we entered the castle. It was not a giant building, but the details of the rooms were luxurious. It was funny to hear that this was the summer home of the royal family. Our guide told us that the King said “Madrid is for the politicians”. I guess this is the reason why the family left for the summers.

It was not a long trip, but there was a lot to see and a lot to learn. What history there was. I am anxiously awaiting to learn more.

Una vista del castillo encima de la fuente real de Segovia / A view of the castle on top of the Royal Fountain of Segovia
El jardín real de Segovia / the Royal Garden in Segovia
Los tronos reales de Segovia / The Royal thrones in Segovia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Religion, Government, and the Czech Republic: It’s complicated.

***First I want to say that I am not here to tell anyone what to think or what to believe.  I am also not attempting to critique any particular religion.  My goal is to inform those who read this of the complicated relationship between religion, government, and the people within the Czech Republic.***

Last Friday we went to a little town outside of Prague called Kutna Hora to see a bone chapel.  The size of the chapel was underwhelming, but the amount of bones in the chapel was astounding!  I took pictures of the story behind the chapel’s creation.

Page one! Long story short, the ground here will not break down the bones, so someone decided to make a chapel out of them.
Page two!

Now some pictures of the hauntingly beautiful bones: 

The creepy and awesome bone chandelier. It’s the first thing you see when you enter.

The Czech Republic has a long and difficult history with the Catholic Church.  The churches, cathedrals, and other christian symbols remain; however, the current population of the Czech Republic is overwhelmingly atheist or agnostic.  My professor Dr. Robbins, an American, told us that they also prefer to not discuss their religious leanings in public.  Czechs do have opinions and beliefs, but because of the strict censorship laws and brutal enforcement of such laws under communism there is still a hesitancy for expression.  Similarly, we were informed, that Czechs do not like to be a part of any conformist organization.  The history of the Catholic Church in this area includes methods of control over Czech peoples lives and livelihood, much like what they experienced under communism.  Czechs learn their history like the back of their hand from the time they are 6 years old, so most Czechs come to the same conclusions.

The Czech perspective is helping me redefine what I think it means to be an American.  (I will not share my new opinions regarding that.)  I will say that immersing myself in another culture has given me a newly calibrated lens with which to view myself and others.  I highly recommend study abroad.  It will change your life!!


Lauren Higgins is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Physics with emphasis in Astronomy.  Lauren is spending the summer abroad at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

The Build-Up

Window seats are the best.

Welcome to “The One Where Natalie Goes to Spain”; a blog about my experience studying abroad for 6 weeks. I started this blog because it’s a requirement for a scholarship, but it will also be used for family and friends to receive updates on my adventures. I have never blogged before, and I am not a super open person so this could be quite interesting. Let’s do this…

Today’s topic is the build-up, meaning my pre-trip  and flight adventures.

Anybody that knows me knows that I procrastinate, which isn’t always a good thing. The trip was no exception. My flight leaves today (June 18) and just yesterday I bought my suitcase and began packing. Despite my love of procrastination, some things can’t be put off like getting a passport or booking a flight. I did those things months ago when the trip still seemed like a distant thought. Now I’m sitting in the airport waiting to board my first flight, and wow this trip feels so real. I am going to Spain…

FullSizeRender

Today was Father’s Day so this morning we drove to Omaha, had a delicious meal (pictured to the left) to celebrate, and then drove to the airport. I said goodbye to my family and proceeded to the security checkpoint…. And never in my life have I been so nervous. I’m not hiding anything or carrying anything illegal, but something about all those TSA agents breeds fear. They pulled my carry-on aside to manually searched it, and my heart stopped. Again, I don’t know why I was so nervous because nothing I have is illegal or dangerous. After waiting around for a bit, we boarded and my first flight was underway. The trip finally became real and I’ve never been more excited in my life. More to come later in the week.

Natalie Rediger


Natalie Rediger is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Criminal Justice and Criminology. Natalie is spending six weeks of the summer studying abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

CASI CASI CASI / Almost Almost Almost

El 18 de Junio

Hola hola,

Me fui de Portugal en la tarde del quince de Junio pero no necesitaba llegar a Madrid hasta el diecinueve de Junio. Esto me daba un poco tiempo para explorar España. El tiempo por España se empezó  por coger un tren por Galicia, la región autónoma española al norte de Portugal. Ved la bandera a la derecha—>[GALICIA] Yo pasé todo el día del dieciséis viajando por Galicia y yo pude visitar tres ciudades gallegas por un ratito por lo menos – la primera era Vigo, la segunda era la famosa Santiago de Compostela, y la tercera era Ourense. Yo aprendí que las lenguas portuguesa y gallega son muy semejantes—como primos más o menos. Yo quería pasar más tiempo en cada ciudad, me habría encantado ver al catedral famoso de Santiago, pero yo estaba tan listo para llegar a Madrid y para terminar de viajar por un rato.

Al llegar a Madrid, yo caminaba por las calles y exploraba la ciudad famosa. Una de las primeras cosas que aprendí era que existen dos banderas madrileñas—[Comunidad Madrileña] y [Ciudad de Madrid]. En mis días aquí, yo pude encontrar unos lugares que me hicieron pensar en hogar. <3 Una tienda latina, donde yo compré un mate nuevo porque el mate que yo traje conmigo se rompió en mi maleta—¡Que triste! El mate que se compró era metálico y más duradero. Se encontró también un restaurante venezolano que vende taqueños, un estilo de comida muy tradicionalmente venezolano. ¡Qué alegría! Yo comía todos los taqueños y mi estomago me sonreía con tanto placer. En ese restaurante, se encontró un consejo venezolano muy verdadero—y muy gracioso. 😛

Yo descanso en mi hostal en mi tarde final antes de que empiece el programa de estudios. Estoy no justo evitando el sol y el calor, pero ya pensando en mis experiencias aquí. Puedo apenas esperar lo que pasará por España en los meses que vienen.

con amor y alegría, Natagnél


The 18th of June

Hello hello,

I left Portugal on the afternoon of the 15th of June but did not need to arrive in Madrid until the 19th. This gave me a little time to explore Spain. My time in Spain was started by taking the train through Galicia, the Spanish autonomous region to the north of Portugal. See the flag above! I spent the whole day of the 16th traveling through Galicia and I managed to visit three Galician cities for a little while at least – the first was Vigo, the second was the infamous Santiago de Compostela, and the third was Ourense. I learned the Portuguese and Galician languages are very similar—like cousins more or less. I was wanting to spend more time in each city, I would have loved to see the famous cathedral of Santiago, but I was so ready to get to Madrid and finish traveling for a while.

Upon arriving in Madrid, I was wandering through the streets and exploring the famous city. One of the first things that I learned was that there are 2 Madrid flags, one of the Madrid community and one of the city of Madrid—see them above! In my days here, I managed to find some places that made me think of home. <3 A Latino shop where I bought a new mate because the mate that I brought with me was broken in my suitcase—how sad! The mate that was purchased is metal and more durable. Also, a Venezuelan restaurant that sells taqueños (a very traditionally Venezuelan style of food) was found. What joy!! I was eating all the taqueños and my stomach was smiling at me with so much pleasure. In the restaurant, a Venezuelan tip was found — very true and very funny. 😛

I am resting in my hostel on my final afternoon before the study program begins. I am not just avoiding the sun and the heat, but already thinking about my experiences here. I can barely wait for what will happen in Spain in the coming month.

With love and joy, Nate


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Adventure Awaits

Hello all! My name is Megan Schwindler and I’ll be studying abroad in Granada, Spain this summer.  I leave tomorrow morning and have been spending the past two days doing some last minute shopping and packing for the trip.

My (kind of) organized suitcase

My suitcase is pretty organized for someone as messy as myself, but I’m still worried I forgot something! I just got back from a week-long vacation in Florida two days ago so this weekend has been quite chaotic. Essentially, I just dumped all the clothes I took to Florida into the washing machine and threw carefully packed them into my suitcase. All in all, it wasn’t too terrible but two days didn’t feel like enough time.

This was taken on my last day in Florida

My toughest decision was what books I wanted to bring (I’m a nerd, I know). I decided that four books would be the limit. I’m currently reading the last book of Game of Thrones so of course I’ll be bringing that. And then I decided I ought to bring milk and honey by Rupi Kaur because well, it’s amazing. I’m also bringing the first Lord of the Rings because I’ve never read it or watched the movie (I know, I’m so weird) but I heard it’s somewhat adventurous and I’m hoping it will motivate me to explore.  And finally, I’m bringing Women Who Run with the Wolves. If you haven’t read it, I highly recommend doing so. It was the book that motivated me to study abroad in the first place!

An excerpt from “Women Who Run with the Wolves”

As far as packing tips go, I would say to pack what you’ll wear. I constantly go on trips and pack cute dresses or wedges that I think I’ll wear but usually don’t even make it out of the suitcase. Birks are an essential item in my suitcase, I wear them with leggings, cute dresses, and even to the beach. I’m also bringing a pair of tennis shoes and a cheap pair of sandals just in case! A lot of my friends and family have asked if I’m nervous or freaking out yet. Surprisingly, I’m not. For me, this is the easy part. I enjoy the packing, planning, organizing, and shopping that a trip as long as this one entails. But once I step off that 14-hour flight in Madrid, I’m probably going to freak out. But who knows?

That’s all I have for now, follow my adventure on wordpress and instagram. And to everyone who is studying abroad this summer, good luck!


Megan Schwindler is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying English Literature and Spanish. Megan is spending the summer abroad with the UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Ir a Granada: Before the Flight Frights

This book has been my focus as my flight anxiety has become prevalent in my travels.

Spain will be my home for six weeks while I attend classes in Granada and tour the country for almost two weeks. What was once just a minuscule possibility in Spanish 221 has become an amazing experience that I will begin in just a few days. The only thing from stopping me now is my flight anxiety. 

I have traveled before: in high school, I crossed the U.S. via plane to Hawaii, where we were invited to march in a Thanksgiving Day Parade.  The first flight, about an hour or so, went well enough, but as soon as the second flight came around, my confidence began to deteriorate and the anxiety overwhelmingly took over my fight or flight responses. But on a plane, there is nowhere to go.

Since that particular flight, I have grown in excitement for the landing in Madrid and cringe at the sight of my plane ticket. My carry-on and personal bag are full of distractions: an iPod for music, my textbook for classes, an amazing journal made just for travelers going to Spain, my boyfriend’s hoodie, practice worksheets to brush up on my Español, and multiple other trinkets to keep me calm when all medicine fails.Ironically, packing has only exasperated this fear of mine, because as soon as all of my bags are packed, the sooner I will be boarding the plane that has recently haunted me into anxiety-dwelling research.

If I am so scared to travel to Spain via aircraft, why I am still continuing this journey?

The concept of studying abroad sparked joy in my mind and my heart. Studying a language that one I that would like to become fluent in is not something that will happen overnight, and probably not in six weeks, either. But it is what I want to do, even if I must travel across the globe on a plane, I have everything I might possibly need to get on that plane, and I will not let my anxiety stop me.


Grace Englehart is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Creative Writing and Spanish. Grace is spending the summer term abroad with the faculty-led UMKC Spanish Program in Granada, Spain.

 Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Trains, Planes, and Scotland. OH MY!

Currently, I am staring at my complete mess on the floor of my bedroom. I am beginning to pack for my trip to Scotland, and I am struggling with the issue of “Do I really need to pack seven pairs of shoes when I know I will only wear two?” The answer is no, but my heart keeps telling me yes. I can’t help but chuckle at myself because I know that my shoes will not matter once I am there. I have never traveled before and when I say that I am not being dramatic. I have never been on a plane or a train before in my entire life. I have seldom ventured outside of my small town and I am about to embark on my first journey across the ocean.

Am I crazy!? I think the answer to that is a definite yes.  By the end of my five weeks I will have taken seven trains, two planes, and countless taxis. The stress I feel is incredible; I have never done this before. What made me think I can do this for the first time in another country!? However, with this stress comes excitement as I am finally exploring the world! I will see countless places such as Edinburgh, Glasgow, and Iverness just to name a few! I guess I am writing this to show everyone if I can study abroad, anyone can. I come from a small town of 424 people, so when I came to Kansas City I felt overwhelmed and shocked. Now, I am about to go to another country and experience all that it has to offer and then some. It is okay to be fearful and hesitant to travel abroad. It is not okay to allow those fears to keep you from experiencing everything the world has to offer you. The packing alone is enough to drive you crazy and call it quits (but don’t let it!).

What do you need and are considered the essentials? Coming from a girl who has never traveled here is my advice: less is more. Do not drag yourself down by over packing and worrying what outfits to bring. I am sure once you get there the main thing you will be worried about is exploring new places, trying new food, basically just doing anything new and exciting. But with that being said, exploring means a lot of walking. So be sure to pack comfortable shoes that you can walk around all day in (and I know you’re thinking about bringing your cutest, but least comfortable shoes, but seriously leave them at home!) Also, bring versatile things like a pair of pants that will match several shirts. Or a shirt that can be dressy with a necklace or dressed down with some leggings. Try to be realistic on your packing and the climate where you are going. For instance, I do not need to pack several pairs of shorts because where I am going it is cool almost every day. I hope you pack the right things, but if you don’t or forget something the beauty in going abroad is spontaneity. They have stores where you can buy this stuff and get a souvenir or a funny story out of it too. I hope that everyone takes the chance to go abroad as it really is a once in a lifetime experience. If a girl from a town that has more cows than people can do it, you can too. Good luck and may adventure find you.


Kylie Wilson is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City studying Nursing. She is spending the summer term abroad with the UMKC Honors Program in Scotland. Kylie is from small town Helena, Missouri and hopes to be a Cardiac Intensive Care Unit nurse in the future. She has a pet cow named Betsy whom she loves dearly.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Home and What It Means

Me and my friend Sam Morse at breakfast at Chez Elle in Kansas City, MO, June 15, 2017. Morning before departure.

Street names – they’re an integral part of life. We use them to get home, to pick up friends, to get to breakfast dates. As I drive the roads of Blue Springs, Grain Valley, Lee’s Summit, and Kansas City for the last time for two months, I know that these roads feel like home. Poets often write about how our own hearts are roadmaps; with love being the ultimate destination: the final home.

But really, what is home?

As I have prepared to leave home for two months, I’ve done a lot of thinking on it. Home is relative. Home is many different things, all at once. It’s a physical house, it’s a metro, it’s a city, it’s a person, it’s a family, it’s a state of mind. Some people spend their entire lives searching for home and never find it.

I am leaving behind all of these things for what promises to be one of the best times of my life. For the next two months, my homes will be hotel rooms, hostel beds, train cars, airplanes, my cousin’s apartment, my dorm in Edinburgh, and Airbnbs in Germany. Home will also be the people I am with: my cousin in Nice, my friend in Paris, his family in Normandy, my classmates in Scotland, and my friends and family I keep in touch with here in Kansas City.

I’m sitting here with Sam outside Chez Elle, listening to the birds, chatter, and the whirring of fire sirens. This feels like home. Life is moving forward, and my life is taking me in a direction that, at this moment, I cannot even fathom. I don’t know what to expect when I get to France, when I get to Scotland, or when I get to Germany – everyone I encounter tells me, “You’re going to have the time of your life. It’s going to be amazing.” And I smile and nod, absolutely terrified. I am approximately 2 parts excitement, and 1 part, “what have I gotten myself into?”

I’m ready. Until August, Kansas City.


Victoria Davidson is a sophomore at the University of Missouri-Kansas City double majoring in History and Foreign Languages and Literature with a German emphasis. Victoria is spending July abroad with the faculty-led UMKC Honors Summer Program in Scotland.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

FLAG DAY

Statue of Gonçalo Velho Cabral in Ponta Delgada / Estatua de Gonçalo Velho Cabral en Ponta Delgada

Hola amigos,

Hoy es el día de la bandera – el catorce de Junio. Mi tiempo en Iberia empezó temprano en Portugal. Portugal no es un país hispanohablante, claro, pero tiene sentido este viaje, os prometo!!! Ved la bandera aquí [PORTUGAL]. Yo volé hasta las islas portuguesas de los Azores (se escribe “Açores” en Portugués). Ved la bandera aquí [AÇORES]. Estaba en la isla “São Miguel” (sería San Miguel en Español) en la ciudad de Ponta Delgada. Yo sentía el calor de la isla por mitad del día, pero a las seis de la tarde, me fui de la isla y volé más tres horas hasta la ciudad de Lisboa – la ciudad capital de Portugal. Ved la bandera aquí [LISBOA]. Esta ciudad es muy vieja y era la ciudad real en una época muy antigua. Era interesante que la ciudad sea una mezcla de los edificios viejos y los estilos nuevos. Después de que visité Lisboa, yo cogí un tren por otras dos horas hasta la ciudad de Coimbra. Ved la bandera aquí [COIMBRA]. El hombre portugués de mi hostal me dijo que era la primera ciudad real hace muchos siglos.

Mucho amor desde Portugal [amor enrollado en una bandera ;)]

Natagnél


Hello friends,

Today is flag day – the 14th of June. My time in Iberia began early in Portugal. Portugal is not a Spanish-speaking country, clearly, but this trip makes sense, I promise!!! See the flag above! I flew to the Portuguese islands, the Azores (written “Açores” in Portuguese). See the flag above! I was on the island “São Miguel” (it would be “San Miguel” in Spanish) in the city Ponta Delgada. I was feeling the heat of the island for half a day, but at 6 in the evening, I left the island and flew 3 more hours to Lisbon – the capital city of Portugal. See the flag above! This city is very old and was the royal city at a former time. It was interesting that the city is a mix of old buildings and the new styles. After I visited Lisbon, I took a train for another 2 hours to the city Coimbra. See the flag above! The Portuguese guy from my hostel told me that it was the first royal city many centuries ago.

Much love from Portugal [love wrapped in a flag ;)]

N8


Natagnél Frisella is a senior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Spanish Language & Literature. Natagnél is traveling through Spain this summer 2017, concluding with the UMKC Spanish Program based at the University of Granada in Southern Spain.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.

Travel is fun but rest, food, and homesick cures are important!

Last weekend my classmates and I went to Český Krumlov, Czech Republic.  At that point I’d been in Prague for a little over a week and had been busy every day since (including an 8 mile hike the weekend before).  I was excited for our trip and optimistic about my energy level for the adventure.  Oh how naive I was. Now, don’t get me wrong.  The trip was beautiful.  Some examples of the beauty.

We hiked up to these castle ruins directly from the train station.
Then we hiked from the ruins to Český Krumlov. Beautiful, right?! (SO tired by this point.)

My classmate Val and I had a mission.  Must find fried cheese.  Fried cheese is a Czech thing.  You HAVE to get fried cheese if and or when you visit.  We HAD to find it.  Our mission began around 8.  We left our beautiful bed and breakfast and headed toward the many restaurants we passed on our way to the hotel.

Our bed and breakfast is the adorable yellow building between the two adorable blue buildings.
The view from outside our hotel.  Love!

We made our way back over the bridge into the middle of the town.  I thought to myself,”This is the Europe I signed up for.”  I was overcome with excitement that I was exactly where I wanted to be! (forgetting that all I had to eat that day was two almond bars, yogurt, and a bag of chips…)

The town center. Complete with a phone booth!!

 

Phone booth! (I was way too excited about this.)

Eventually we remembered how hungry we were and how far we’d wandered from the hotel not finding fried cheese!

I’m so hungry-excited!

So, my classmate Val, messages our professor who recommended a place.  Where was this place, you ask?  Here…

Recognize these view?

Yes.  There was fried cheese in the restaurant below our room.  At this point it was about 9:30 and I was feeling the lack of food setting in.  I hoped that my experience with slow service in Prague did not translate to Český Krumlov.  I was wrong.  Just after the sunset Val and I got our fried cheese!

Victory is ours!!

We ate, laughed, shared stories about our lives, and awkwardly interacted with our server.

After dinner, around 10:30, I was fading fast and needed to sleep.  I didn’t quite feel like my usual self, but I thought all I needed was a good night’s sleep.  I happily made it through the first part of the day, seeing art and old telescopes at an old monastery. (I am an astrophysics major.)

Telescope used to look at the sun!

Fun, right?  For a while on this early 7AM day I enjoyed the art, the history, and the physics relics.  After another hike back down to Český Krumlov and up to another castle (twice) I hit an emotional wall.  I needed a break.  I needed to be alone.  I needed to do nothing.  So, I broke from the group, quietly sobbed, and found a calm little cafe.  Through my tears I timidly ordered an espresso and a tiramisu from a barista with an extremely uncomfortable look on her face.

The remains of my sorrowful but delicious snack.

We eventually got on a bus to return to Prague.  I cried half of the way there, missing home, and messaging my friends and my boyfriend.  After words of love and support from the people I love the most I felt a bit better.  New mission: Rest when I need rest!  Now, 4 days later, I feel back to normal.  Plans for this weekend?  I will take it easy and stay in Prague.

Also, when you’re home sick, find a Starbucks.

Homesickness cure.

Lauren Higgins is a junior at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, studying Physics with emphasis in Astronomy.  Lauren is spending the summer abroad at Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.

Student blog entries posted to the Roos Abroad Blog may not reflect the opinions and recommendations of UMKC Study Abroad and International Academic Programs. The blog is intended to give students a forum for free expression of thoughts and experiences abroad in a respectful space.