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George Packer – Cockefair Lecture Feb. 26, 2015

George Packer, a staff writer for The New Yorkeris the author of ”Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq.” This work analyzes the events that led to the 2003 invasion of Iraq and reports on subsequent developments in that country, largely based on interviews with ordinary Iraqis. Because of current unrest in the Middle East, Packer’s timely Cockefair Spring Lecture will center on renewed tensions in that region, the emergence of ISIS and our commitment of more troops to Iraq.

He is also the author of  ”The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America,” a New York Times best seller and National Book Award winner; two novels, “The Half Man” and “Central Square”; and the play, “Betrayed.” He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Holtzbrinck Fellow at the American Academy in Berlin.

The program is Feb. 26 in Pierson Auditorium, Atterbury Student Success Center, 5000 Holmes, KCMO. there is no charge for the lecture, but a reservation is requested.

A reception and refreshments will be served in Pierson at 6 p.m. and the program will start at 6:30.

Cockefair Chair Spring 2015 Courses

The Cockefair Chair committee, in conjunction with the College of Arts and Sciences, has again arranged a series of non-credit classes that are provocative, informative and timely. Using the blue “Cockefair Classes” button at the top of this page, you will find a rundown of the offerings for Spring 2015 and an enrollment form. Learn about the evolution of film, the meanings in book illustrations, women authors finding their voices, and the upcoming elections of 2016. Class size is limited, so sign up promptly.

Geology And Noah’s Flood

After extensive exploration into geological records of Noah’s flood, Dr. David Montgomery is well-positioned to share his findings. On Thursday, Nov. 6, Montgomery will report on his findings in a presentation entitled, “Rocks Don’t Lie: a Geologist Investigates Noah’s Flood.” Montgomery brings a fair and deep understanding to both religion and reason. The free program is at 7 p.m. in Pierson Auditorium, Atterbury Student Success Center.

Dr. James Murowchick, Associate Professor of Geochemistry and Mineralogy, will introduce Dr. Montgomery. Murowchick says, “As both a practicing Christian and a geologist, Dr. Montgomery’s work is close to home for me. His balanced and respectful treatment of the issues is a breath of fresh air.”

Cockefair Chair Fall Courses 2014

Fall 2014 Cockefair Chair Courses

 Great American Theatre:  Thornton Wilder
Felicia Londre, Ph.D., Curators Professor
Department of Theatre
10:30 – noon
Thursdays, Sept. 11, 18, 25, and Oct. 2
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
$45 ($65 with optional parking permits)

Beginning with an overview of Thornton Wilder’s life, work, and times, this course will go on to discuss some of Wilder’s important works, virtually all of which grapple with issues of seeing a world in a grain of sand.  Wilder (1897-1975) won three Pulitzer Prizes, two for plays Professor Londre will discuss, Our Town and The Skin of Our Teeth, and one for his novella, The Bridge of San Luis Rey.   Concurrently with Professor Londre’s course, Our Town runs 5 to 28 September at the Kansas City Repertory Theatre.  Dr. Londre will also discuss The Skin of Our Teeth and its 1961 U.S. State Department-sponsored tour of the 1955 production.  And in the last session, Professor Londre will discuss The Matchmaker, including its sources and spin-offs (including Hello, Dolly!) and also provide a glance at Wilder’s novels, short plays, and philosophy.

From Prince of Pleasure to the Uncle of Europe: The Life of King Edward VII
Dr. Lynda Payne, Ph.D., R.N., Sirridge Missouri Endowed Professor in Medical Humanities and Bioethics,
School of Medicine, and Associate Professor, Department of History
10:30 a.m. – noon
Tuesdays, Oct. 7, 14, and 21
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
$34 ($49 with optional parking permits)

Edward VII has always been an enigma.  Born in 1841 to Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, as a young man he became a leader of London society. Although married, he also had a series of long-term mistresses, including the actress Lily Langtry and Alice Keppel, the great-grandmother of Camilla, wife of the current Prince of Wales. Newspapers delighted in reporting on the escapades of Prince Edward the Caresser, yet there was another side to Edward. Although he was 59 when he finally became king and ruled for a scant nine years until his death, historians regard Edward as having established the first modern monarchy.  He travelled widely on diplomatic missions and was affectionately referred to as the Uncle of Europe. The Edwardian period has been seen as a golden age for the aristocracy in Europe and America (Downton Abbey), but it was also a tumultuous era of political and social unrest. As King Edward VII remarked shortly before his death, “We are all socialists now.” This three-lecture series examines the life and legacy of this complex king.

The Rise of American Industrialism
William Black, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of Economics and School of Law
10:30 – noon
Tuesdays, Oct. 28 and Nov. 4 and 11
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
$34 ($49 with optional parking permits)

In this course Professor Black will discuss the impact of industrialism, particularly in the United States, during the early 20th century before and around World War I.  Dr. Black will discuss the major internal migration developing industrialism induced, particularly among African-Americans moving from the rural South to the north.  The course will also include the beginning of the general U.S. transition from rural to urban, as well as the rise of new immigrant populations, such as Italians, that increased rapidly during the time period before WWI.


UMKC College of Arts and Sciences Continuing Education

Noncredit Registration
Carolyn Benton Cockefair Chair Courses Spring 2014
Space is limited. Only paid pre-registration assures a seat in the class.

Enroll me in the following:

Great American Theatre:  Thornton Wilder  $45 ($65 with optional parking permits)

o From Prince of Pleasure to the Uncle of Europe: The Life of King Edward VII  $34 ($49 with optional parking permits)

The Rise of American Industrialism  $34 ($49 with optional parking permits)

Name
Address
City State ZIP
Phone
Email address
Method of payment (check one)

o Check (made payable to UMKC)

o MasterCard o Visa o Discover
Card number
Expiration date
Cardholder’s name Relationship
Signature

Return this form to:

University of Missouri-Kansas City
College of Arts and Sciences
Continuing Education
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2446

Fax: 816-235-5279
Call 816-235-2736 to register by phone.
Relay Missouri: 1-800-735-2966 (TTY)

 

2014-15 Cockefair Chair Poet in Residence is Ellen Bryant Voigt

Ellen Bryant Voigt

Poet Ellen Bryant Voigt is the Cockefair Chair writer-in-residence for UMKC’s M.F.A. Creative Writing Program. She will visit campus from September 21 to 24.

On Sunday, September 21, Voigt is offering a Master Class for MFA poetry students from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The class will convene in Cockefair Hall, Room 104, on the UMKC campus, 52nd Street and Rockhill Road, Kansas City, Mo. The session is open to the public, with parking available in the rear of the building.

Voigt will read from her works at the Miller Nichols Library Learning Resource Center, 800 E. 51st Street, Kansas City, Mo., to be followed by a book signing and reception sponsored by the UMKC Friends of the Library. This reading is at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 23, on the 4th Floor of the Resource Center.

She has published eight collections of poetry, and is recognized for her writing on the art of poetry. She has received the O. B. Hardison, Jr. Prize from the Folger Library, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Merrill Fellowship from the Academy of American Poets. Her poetry appears in the New Yorker, The Atlantic, and “Best American Poetry.”  Voigt lives in Vermont, where she teaches in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

Voigt’s appearances are sponsored by UMKC’s Creative Writing Program, and financial support comes from the Cockefair Chair in Continuing Education.

For more information, please contact the Creative Writing Program, UMKC Department of English, 816 235-1307.

Scholar identifies music of WWI era as propaganda

The August 14, 2014 Cockefair Chair luncheon will feature Dr. Kristin Griffeath, voice and music history professor at Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Dr. Griffeath is a graduate of UMKC’s Conservatory of Music and Dance, and her research interest is the music of World War I and how it was used to sell the war to Americans. Her research was featured in an exhibit, “Harmonies of the Homefront,” at Kansas City’s National World War I Museum.

Tickets are $18.50. To order, email go.umkc.edu/griffeath or call the UMKC Central Ticket Office at 816-235-2704. Online orders may have additional fees, and may be placed using American Express, MasterCard, Visa or Discover.

 

WWI historian examines Verdun

John Mosier will discuss an often-overlooked aspect of World War I and the subject of his book, “Verdun: The Lost History of the Most Important Battle of World War I, 1914-1918,” on April 9, 2014, in Pierson Auditorium at 7 p.m. Mosier, a professor of English at Loyola University of New Orleans and military history revisionist, is the Cockefair Chair Spring 2014 guest lecturer whose presentation aligns with the Chair’s concentration on the 100th anniversary of the Great War.

The event is free, but reservations are requested through UMKC’s Central Ticket Office. Please call 816-235-6222 or visit the  website at go.umkc.edu/mosier.  For Cockefair events on the UMKC campus, free parking is offered on the 4th and 5th levels of the parking garage at Oak Street and 51st. From there, covered walkways lead to Pierson Auditorium in the Student Success Center.

Cockefair Chair course schedule Spring 2014

Classes shed light on Great War in 100th anniversary year

To Make the World Safe for Democracy: The U.S. and the Great War, 1914–1920
COURSE COMPLETED

Dennis Merrill, Ph.D., Curators’ Teaching Professor
Department of History
1–2:30 p.m.
Wednesdays, Jan. 22 and 29 and Feb. 5
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
5115 Oak St.
$34 ($49 with optional parking permits)
This course reviews the domestic and international politics that fashioned America’s agonizing path from neutrality to belligerency. It also analyzes President Wilson’s hopes to replace European power politics with a multilateral world system, and evaluates Wilson’s post-war diplomacy and the U.S. Senate’s rejection of membership in the League of Nations.

Toward America: Early 20th Century Ethnic and Minority Literary Visions
COURSE COMPLETED

Anthony Shiu, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of English
10:30 a.m.–noon
Wednesdays, Feb. 12, 19 and 26
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
5115 Oak St.
$34 ($49 with optional parking permits)
Early 20th century ethnic and minority writers contributed to an already strong literary tradition by developing new ways of imagining American society. Writers redefined concepts we still wrestle with — diversity, equality, multiculturalism and justice. Authors discussed will include Mary Antin, W.E.B. DuBois, Sui Sin Far/Edith Eaton, Michael Gold, Younghill Kang, Nella Larsen, Booker T. Washington and Anzia Yezierska.

Edith Wharton: War-time Writing, Novels and Films
COURSE COMPLETED
Jane Greer, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of English
10:30 a.m.–noon
Tuesdays, March 4, 11 and 18
UMKC Administrative Center, Plaza Room
5115 Oak St.
$34 ($49 with optional parking permits)
With the centennial commemorations of WWI, the time is ripe to reconsider the impact of WWI on Edith Wharton, who was named a chevalier in the Legion of Honour for her work on behalf of refugees. The course will include Wharton’s reports on her visits to the front lines, Fighting France: from Dunkerque to Belport, and her anti-war novel, A Son at the Front.

Moving, Dredging, Spanning, Building: Great Construction Projects from Stonehenge to the Panama Canal
COURSE COMPLETED
William Ashworth Jr., Ph.D., Associate Professor
Department of History
10:30 a.m.–noon
Wednesdays, April 2, 9, 16 and 30
Linda Hall Library Auditorium
5109 Cherry St.
$45
This course will look at some of the greatest engineering feats in history — erecting the Florence Cathedral dome, moving the Vatican obelisk and spanning the Mississippi River. The course is offered in conjunction with the Linda Hall Library’s spring exhibition, celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal in 1914.

To enroll, print this form, call 816-235-2736  or fax 816-235-5279
Space is limited. Only paid pre-registration assures a seat in the class.
Enroll me in the following:
o To Make the World Safe for Democracy
o Include parking for this class
o Toward America: Early 20th Century Visions
o Include parking for this class
o Edith Wharton: War-time Writing, Novels and Films
o Include parking for this class
o Great Construction Projects
Name
Address
City State ZIP
Phone
Email address
Method of payment (check one)
o Check (made payable to UMKC)
o MasterCard o Visa o Discover
Card number
Expiration date
Cardholder’s name Relationship
Signature
Return this form to:
University of Missouri-Kansas City
College of Arts and Sciences
Continuing Education
5100 Rockhill Road
Kansas City, MO 64110-2446
Fax: 816-235-5279
Call 816-235-2736 to register by phone.

For more information, visit umkc.edu/cockefairchair.

Participants may purchase parking permits at an additional charge of $5 per course session, or $15 or $20 per course. Parking permits allow attendees to park anywhere without paying meters, but permits do not guarantee space in a particular lot. Parking permits will be mailed to attendees before each course begins.

Inclement weather policy: If the Kansas City, Mo., School District is closed, scheduled Cockefair course sessions will not meet.

Russia, the Romanovs and the Coming of the Great War

IslBGRobert Massie, widely regarded as the foremost expert on the Russian royal family and with more than 6 million books sold worldwide, will speak on the influences of the Romanovs on the Great War. 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of World War One. Massie’s presentation is at 7:00 p.m. on October 28 in Pierson Auditorium, Atterbury Student Success Center, 51st and Holmes. Tickets are available through the Central Ticket Office. There is no cost, but reservations are requested.

Massie earned a Pulitzer Prize for his biography “Peter the Great.” From 1959–1962, Massie was on the staff of Newsweek where he was a book reviewer, foreign news writer and U.N. bureau chief. His writing also has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, The New York Times, Saturday Review, Life and other publications. Over the years, he has been an historical adviser to, and has made frequent appearances on, a number of national television programs and documentaries.

Free parking is available in the lot north of the Student Success Center or in the Cherry Street Parking structure, where event parking is on levels 5 & 6.

Unexpected Power of Friendship: Carlin Flora, Aug. 20

FloraAuthor Carlin Flora will discuss “The Unexpected Power of Friendship” at the Cockefair Chair luncheon  on Aug. 20 in Pierson Auditorium, Atterbury Student Success Center, 50th and Holmes, KCMO 64110. Doors open at 11:30 a.m.

Based on her book, Friendfluence: The Surprising Ways Friends Make Us Who We Are, Flora will describe how friends influence us in almost every way. James H. Fowler, author of Connected, writes that Friendfluence “shines with authenticity and is a must-read for anyone who wants to know more about our ancient desire to connect.” Flora uses her background and knowledge of science, psychology and philosophy to illustrate why we should carefully cultivate our friendships in the same way we nurture other relationships.

Flora was on the staff of Psychology Today  magazine for eight years, most recently as Features Editor. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan and the Columbia University School of Journalism and has written for Discover, Glamour, Women’s Health, and Men’s Health, among others. She has appeared on The Today Show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and 20/20. Ms. Flora is a frequent contributor to Time Magazine and Psychology Today, and has appeared on Katie Couric  and the Today Show. Ms. Flora lives in New York.

Reservations are $18.50 and can be made through the Central Ticket Office, 816-235-6222, or go.umkc.edu/carlinflora. The final date for reservations is August 13.

Information about this and other programs of interest can be found at http://info.umkc.edu/cockefairchair/.